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See Inside Scientific American Volume 309, Issue 4

October 2013 Advances: Additional Resources

Coyotes in the Crosswalks? Fuggedaboutit!

Researcher Stanley Gehrt’s 2009 study on urban coyotes in Chicago is available in The Journal of Mammology.

Doing a World of Good

Rajiv Shah, administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development, says more about his support of GMOs as a solution for world hunger in the New York Times Opinion Pages.

The Perfect Kelvin

A longer version of the story on better defining how temperature relates to changes in energy was published online. The latest findings on the relationship were published in the journal Metrologia.  

Universe Out of Balance

Data suggest that the universe is lopsided, with one side being much hotter than the other, but comprehensive simulations published in Astrophysical Journal Letters show that this is a highly improbable occurrence.

The Holey Land

The full study on Israel’s new method of detecting future sinkholes with the use of radar measurements is behind a paywall in Geology.

What Is It?
The hovering nanodiamond pictured is used to demonstrate that lasers can manipulate quantum states inside crystals. The findings are available behind a paywall in Optics Letters.

Taste-Blind Mice Make Tangled Sperm

The unexpected connection between genes that control taste receptors in mice and those that aid their sperm development is reported in a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA.

The Great Explicator

Martin Gardner, author of Scientific American’s “Mathematical Games” column from 1956 to 1981 and of Undiluted Hocus-Pocus, a posthumous autobiography, wrote his last article for the magazine in 1998. It includes four puzzles by Gardner, and is available online.

Madagascar’s Towering Baobab Trees on the Brink

A longer version of this story on the possible extinction of baobab trees in the near future is available online.

The Liver Transplant Divide

More information on researchers’ proposed redistricting of U.S. organ distribution maps via Johns Hopkins.

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