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Apple Warns Against Jailbreaking Following Evasi0n Hack

Apple has tweaked an online article about the dangers of jailbreaking in the wake of a recent hack of iOS code

(Credit:

Jason Cipriani/CNET)

Apple has tweaked an online article about the dangers of jailbreaking in the wake of a recent hack of iOS code.

The article shows a last-modified date of Sunday, the same day the evasi0n jailbreak tool for iOS 6.0 through 6.1 was due to reach the public. The tool didn't actually pop up until Monday, but the timing of the modified article certainly points to concern on Apple's part.

Exactly what was updated in Apple's article is difficult to know. But the company cites a range of hazards that it associates with jailbreaking, including instability, security vulnerabilities, shortened battery life, unreliable voice and data, disruption of services, and the inability to apply future software updates.

The U.S. Copyright Office ruled last October that jailbreaking is legal, at least when it comes to smartphones. But Apple considers the practice a violation of the end-user license and as such won't necessarily provide any support or service for a jailbroken device.

Jailbreaking allows people to install applications outside of Apple's App Store.

Apple's full warning reads as follows:

As designed by Apple, iOS and iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch are designed to work together reliably. Unauthorized modifications to iOS ("jailbreaking") can cause numerous issues to the hacked iPhone, iPad or iPod touch. Examples of issues caused by these unauthorized modifications to iOS have included the following:

Instability: Frequent and unexpected crashes of the device, crashes and freezes of built-in apps and third-party apps, and loss of data.

Security vulnerabilities: Security compromises have been introduced by these modifications that could allow hackers to steal personal information, damage the device, attack the wireless network, or introduce malware or viruses.

Shortened battery life: The hacked software has caused an accelerated battery drain that shortens the operation of an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch on a single battery charge.

Unreliable voice and data: Dropped calls, slow or unreliable data connections, and delayed or inaccurate location data.

Disruption of services: Services such as Visual Voicemail, Weather, and Stocks have been disrupted or no longer work on the device. Additionally, third-party apps that use the Apple Push Notification Service have had difficulty receiving notifications or received notifications that were intended for a different hacked device. Other push-based services such as iCloud and Exchange have experienced problems synchronizing data with their respective servers.

Inability to apply future software updates: Some unauthorized modifications have caused damage to iOS that is not repairable. This can result in the hacked iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch becoming permanently inoperable when a future Apple-supplied iOS update is installed.

Apple strongly cautions against installing any software that hacks iOS. It is also important to note that unauthorized modification of iOS is a violation of iOS end-user license agreement and because of this, Apple may deny service for an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch that has installed any unauthorized software.

(Via 9to5Mac)

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