ADVERTISEMENT

Blinking Turns Off the Brain

THIS IS A PREVIEW.
or subscribe to access the full article.

We blink an average of 15 times a minute. So why don’t we notice our world repeatedly going dark?

University College London scientists used fMRI brain imaging to find out. They placed light-blocking goggles on volunteers and put a strong fiber-optic light source against the roof of subjects’ mouths, which illuminated the eye through the skull. This combination created constant visual stimulation in the optic nerve and brain that blinking did not interrupt. Yet the fMRI scans showed that each blink temporarily shut down certain parts of the visual cortex. Activity was also decreased in parts of the parietal and prefrontal regions involved in consciousness and awareness of change. The act of blinking, it seems, makes the brain blind to the interruption.

THIS IS A PREVIEW.
or subscribe to access the full article.
Buy Digital Issue $7.95
Browse all subscription options! Subscribe
Share this Article:

Comments

You must sign in or register as a ScientificAmerican.com member to submit a comment.

The Pi Day Commemorative Package

Get 3 of our best-selling Pi topic issues
Plus a FREE Bonus Issue!

Add to your cart now for just $9.99 >

X

Email this Article

X