Cloning of a Human

The process is extremely difficult, but it also seems inevitable
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Ever since the birth of Dolly the sheep in 1996, human cloning for reproductive purposes has seemed inevitable. Notwithstanding past dubious claims of such an achievement—including one by a company backed by a UFO cult—no human clones have been made, other than those born naturally as identical twins. Despite success with other mammals, the process has proved much more difficult in humans—which may strike some people as comforting and others as disappointing.

Scientists generate clones by replacing the nucleus of an egg cell with that from another individual. They have cloned human embryos, but none has yet successfully grown past the early stage where they are solid balls of cells known as morulas—the act of transferring the nucleus may disrupt the ability of chromosomes to align properly during cell division. “Whenever you clone a new species, there’s a learning curve, and with humans it’s a serious challenge getting enough good-quality egg cells to learn with,” says Robert Lanza of Advanced Cell Technology in Worcester, Mass., who made headlines in 2001 for first cloning human embryos. Especially tricky steps include discovering the correct timing and mix of chemicals to properly reprogram the cell.

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