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Light Sails to Orbit

NASA watches from the sidelines as Cosmos 1, the first solar sail, goes up
cosmos 1



COURTESY OF THE PLANETARY SOCIETY AND COSMOS STUDIOS; IMAGE PREPARED BY BABAKIN SPACE CENTER

Shiny and crinkly, the material looks more like something meant to wrap frozen foods than to provide a new way to travel through space. The aluminized Mylar reflects sunlight, thereby deriving a little kick from the recoiling photons. In principle, big sheets could act as solar sails that over time would reach speeds exceeding 100 kilometers a second¿far faster than chemical rockets.

The first solar sail, called Cosmos 1, will go for its test flight in early 2004. The demonstration of a revolutionary way to travel to the planets and maybe even to the stars would seem to be a natural activity for NASA, which spends several million dollars every year researching advanced propulsion systems. Yet in this case, the space agency has chosen to be a bystander.

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