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30 under 30: Going with the Flow

Meet Sander Huisman, 24, one of the up-and-coming physicists attending this year's Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting



Image courtest of Sander Huisman

The annual Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting brings a wealth of scientific minds to the shores of Germany’s Lake Constance. Every summer at Lindau, dozens of Nobel Prize winners exchange ideas with hundreds of young researchers from around the world. Whereas the Nobelists are the marquee names, the younger contingent is an accomplished group in its own right. In advance of this year’s meeting, which focuses on physics, we are profiling several promising attendees under the age of 30. The profile below is the 23rd in a series of 30.

Name: Sander Huisman
Age: 24
Born: Sneek, The Netherlands
Nationality: Dutch

Current position: Ph.D. student at the University of Twente, The Netherlands
Education: Bachelor’s degree and Master's degree the University of Twente

What is your field of research?
My area of research is in fluid mechanics. To be more precise, I’m looking at turbulent Taylor-Couette flow.

What drew you to physics, and to that research area in particular?
In high school I already enjoyed the exact sciences, and it was clear to me that I should pursue a career in science. Being able to explain everyday phenomena is what drew me to physics. In the realm of physics I ended up in turbulent flows. I see it as a experimental and theoretical challenge to be able to describe such flows.

Where do you see yourself in 10 years?
I hope to have a permanent position at a university and I would like to do research in fluid dynamics. I think academic research is the way to go; doing research while passing on the knowledge to the next generation.

Who are your scientific heroes?
Sir Geoffrey Ingram Taylor, for his many discoveries in fluid mechanics and the use of both experiments and theoretical analysis in his research. Walter Lewin, for his clear and concise way of explaining phenomena in physics, and his implementation of demonstrative experiments as part of his lectures and his engaging way of lecturing.

What activities outside of physics do you most enjoy?
I enjoy photography and traveling, and it is best when combined.

What do you hope to gain from this year’s Lindau meeting?
I’m eager to hear their stories; how did they get to the bottom of their problem, did they realize the importance of their research beforehand, what is their work ethic? I’m curious about the stories behind the discoveries. Being able to meet dozens of Nobel prize winners is, of course, a big honour, and it will be a truly inspiring experience. Also, meeting fellow young researchers could initiate long-term collaboration and friendship.

Are there any Nobelists whom you are particularly excited to meet or learn from at Lindau?
I would like to meet the Dutch nobelists, overall though I will go there open-minded and be inspired by all of their stories.

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22. Ragnar Stroberg
30 Under 30:
Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting
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24. Martina Abb

 

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