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See Inside Scientific American Mind Volume 25, Issue 3

May/June 2014 Scientific American MIND News Ticker

Prions, the proteins made famous for their role in mad cow disease, also become active when your brain forms a long-term memory. 
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/prions-are-key-to-preserving-long-term-memories 

Baboons use different kinds of yawns to send a social signal of either aggression or friendliness. 
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/baboons-use-yawns-to-convey-social-messages/ 

In a recent survey, 87 percent of respondents said they would zap their brain with electricity if it could enhance their performance at school or work.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/should-we-use-devices-to-make-us-smarter 

Nicotine is the most reliable cognitive enhancer that currently known.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/will-a-nicotine-patch-make-you-smarter-excerpt/

Brain scans can predict a child’s future working memory, a capacity similar to a mental scratch pad, which in turn predicts academic success.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/brain-scans-show-promise-for-early-detection-of-cognitive-problems 

Why are dogs so into us? According to one study, it boils down to their oxytocin receptor gene.
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/dog-spies/2014/01/28/mans-best-friend-the-mysterious-role-of-oxytocin-revealed/ 

Child prodigies differ from regular kids not in their IQ but in their astounding working memory.
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/beautiful-minds/2014/02/10/the-mind-of-the-prodigy/

Environmental toxins and pollutants appear to increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/studies-link-ddt-other-environmental-toxins-to-late-onset-alzheimers-disease 

Keeping different sleep schedules on work days and days off, known as social jet lag, might be as disruptive as flying across time zones.
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/mind-guest-blog/2014/02/11/why-we-are-not-getting-enough-sleep/?WT.mc_id=SA_MindFacebook 

To develop a child's social reasoning skills, try to pepper your speech with “thought words” such as know, forget, think and understand.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-benefits-of-talking-about-thoughts-with-tots/ 

Asian elephants will console a distressed fellow elephant by touching the other animal with their trunk and chirping. 
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/asian-elephants-console-each-other-when-in-distress/

Not all happy lives are meaningful: researchers suspect happiness is about getting what we want, but meaningfulness is rooted in giving, effort and sacrifice. 
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/a-happy-life-may-not-be-a-meaningful-life 
 

This article was originally published with the title "May/June 2014 Scientific American MIND News Ticker."

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