ADVERTISEMENT
See Inside Scientific American Volume 307, Issue 5

Recession Forces Districts to Cut Back on Lifesaving Vaccinations

Health departments have shrunk, raising fears about epidemics
vaccinatons, needle, syringe



DAVIES AND STARR Getty Images

Local and state health departments across the U.S. monitor communities for infectious disease outbreaks, ensure that restaurant food is safe, and provide walk-in immunization and clinics for sexually transmitted diseases. Yet since the financial crisis began in 2007, 40 percent of the nation's health departments have suffered serious budget cuts that have forced them to shed a quarter of their workforce. Many experts fear that these cutbacks are putting the country at risk for epidemics.

Consider Duval County, Florida: it is in the midst of the worst tuberculosis outbreak in the U.S. in 20 years, yet in March, Florida governor Rick Scott signed a bill downsizing the state health department and closing A. G. Holley State Hospital, which specialized in treating tuberculosis patients who were not taking their medications, a practice that spurs drug resistance. (Mike Haridopolos, president of the Florida Senate, has said that the budget helped make the state “more attractive to business owners and entrepreneurs,” in part because it did not raise taxes.) “The outbreak is among the very people who were typically candidates for A. G. Holley,” says Marc Yacht, former president of the Florida Public Health Association. Some patients were transferred to other hospitals, and the four who were discharged are considered noninfectious, and health workers are checking on them daily, reports the Florida Department of Public Health.

This is only a preview. Get the rest of this article now!

Select an option below:

Customer Sign In

*You must have purchased this issue or have a qualifying subscription to access this content


It has been identified that the institution you are trying to access this article from has institutional site license access to Scientific American on nature.com.
Click here to access this article in its entirety through site license access.

Rights & Permissions
Share this Article:

Comments

You must sign in or register as a ScientificAmerican.com member to submit a comment.
Scientific American Dinosaurs

Get the
latest special collector's edition, Dinosaurs!

Limited Time Offer!

Purchase Now >

X

Email this Article

X