ADVERTISEMENT
See Inside June/July 2007

Stress Kills Brain Cells Off

Stress is a killer—at least for brain cells. A new animal study shows that a single socially stressful situation can destroy newly created neurons in the hippocampus, the brain region involved in memory and emotion.

Although most of the brain stops growing by adulthood, new nerve cells are continually generated in the hippocampus, where they are essential for learning. Scientists have long known that chronic stress can inhibit this neurogenesis and lead to depression. Daniel Peterson and his colleagues at the Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science wanted to find out how the brain reacted to just a single stressful episode.

This is only a preview. Get the rest of this article now!

Select an option below:

Customer Sign In

*You must have purchased this issue or have a qualifying subscription to access this content


It has been identified that the institution you are trying to access this article from has institutional site license access to Scientific American on nature.com.
Click here to access this article in its entirety through site license access.

Share this Article:

Comments

You must sign in or register as a ScientificAmerican.com member to submit a comment.
Scientific American Holiday Sale

Give a Gift &
Get a Gift - Free!

Give a 1 year subscription as low as $9.99

Subscribe Now! >

X

Email this Article

X