At dawn on a summer morning in 2012, we were on our third round of espresso when the video link connected our office at the California Institute of Technology to the CERN laboratory near Geneva. On the monitor we saw our colleagues on the Razor team, one of many groups of physicists analyzing data from the CMS experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Razor was created to search for exotic collisions that would provide the first evidence of supersymmetry, a 45-year-old theory of matter that would supplant the standard understanding of particle physics, solving deep problems in physics and explaining the nature of the universe's mysterious dark matter. After decades of searching, no experimental evidence for supersymmetry has been found.