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See Inside Scientific American Mind Volume 25, Issue 2

Zapping the Brain Increases Art's Appeal

People find art more beautiful when certain areas of their brain are electrically stimulated



STUART BRIERS

Beauty seems mysterious and subjective. Scientists have long attempted to explain why the same object can strike some individuals as breathtaking and others as repulsive. Now a study finds that applying stimulation to a certain brain area enhances people's aesthetic appreciation of visual images.

First, participants viewed 70 abstract paintings and sketches and 80 representational (realistic) paintings and photographs and rated how much they liked each one. Then they rated a similar set of images after receiving transcranial direct-current stimulation or sham stimulation. Transcranial direct-current stimulation sends small electrical impulses to the brain through electrodes attached to the head. The technique is noninvasive and cannot be felt, so subjects in the trials were not aware when they received real stimulation. The researchers aimed the impulses at the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, an area just behind the brow that is known to be a region critical for emotional processing. They found that the stimulation increased participants' appreciation of representational images, according to the study published online in October 2013 inSocial Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. The scientists believe the stimulation facilitated a shift from object recognition to aesthetic appraisal for the figurative images; the abstract art was probably being processed by a different area of the brain.

This study is one of many recent successful attempts at subtly altering cognition with noninvasive brain stimulation. Some experiments have found that stimulating certain areas allows people to solve math problems or puzzles that formerly had them stumped. Other work suggests these techniques can enhance motor learning, helping athletes or musicians improve at a new sport or a new instrument more rapidly. Experts are quick to point out, however, that these effects are modest enhancements at best—thought induction remains firmly in the realm of science fiction.

Still, the researchers behind the new paper are hopeful that the findings could lead to new treatments for mood disorders. “In the case of depression, you lose the pleasure of experiencing life, and you also lose the pleasure you can derive from looking at something beautiful,” explains lead author Zaira Cattaneo, a neuroscientist at the University of Milano-Bicocca in Italy. “Maybe we can give back to these patients some pleasant experiences.”

This article was originally published with the title "In the Brain of the Beholder."

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