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Stories by Anne Casselman

Getting the Grizzly Story: What Its Like to Report in Canada's Great Bear Rainforest

Editor's note: This post is part of a four-part series that Anne Casselman, a freelance writer and regular contributor to Scientific American , reported in early June during a rare opportunity to conduct field reporting on grizzly bears in Heiltsuk First Nation traditional territory in British Columbia.

August 8, 2011 — Anne Casselman

Salmon farms in the Bay of Fundy worry fishermen

Editor's Note: Expedition Blue Planet, led by Jacques Cousteau's granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America's most pressing water-use and management stories.

October 27, 2010 — Anne Casselman

What is stormwater runoff, and why does it matter?

Editor's Note: Expedition Blue Planet , led by Jacques Cousteau's granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America's most pressing water-use and management stories.

October 21, 2010 — Anne Casselman

Electroshocking for fish at the Kingston Coal-Ash Spill Site

Editor's Note: Expedition Blue Planet , led by Jacques Cousteau's granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America's most pressing water-use and management stories.

September 28, 2010 — Anne Casselman

On eve of EPA hearings, scientists sample lake for coal-ash toxins

Editor's Note: Expedition Blue Planet, led by Jacques Cousteau's granddaughter Alexandra Cousteau, is traveling 14,500 miles of road over 138 days to investigate and film some of North America's most pressing water-use and management stories.

September 15, 2010 — Anne Casselman