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Stories by Ashutosh Jogalekar

Gavrilo Princip, conspiracy theories and the fragility of cause and effect

A hundred years ago this day in Sarajevo, disgruntled nationalist Gavrilo Princip fired a shot. An Archduke and his wife died, the world mourned and fulminated, and in a rash of misunderstanding and patriotic throes the nations of Europe went to war with each other, a war that in its calculated butchery exceeded all that [...]

June 28, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

Philosophy begins where physics ends, and physics begins where philosophy ends

Physicist Sean Carroll has some words of wisdom for physicists who might have less than complimentary things to say about philosophy. The most recent altercation between a physicist and philosophy came from Neil deGrasse Tyson who casually disparaged philosophy in a Q&A session, saying that it can be a time sink and it doesn’t actually [...]

June 23, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

Verizon Ad Warns Parents Not to Squelch Daughters' Interest in Science

At a time when we are still seeing subtle and not-so-subtle opposition to fostering young girls’ interest in STEM disciplines and to women’s mobility in professional science, it’s encouraging to see this ad from Verizon asking parents to not squelch their daughters’ natural curiosity.

June 12, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

Truth and beauty in science

Philip Ball who is one of my favorite science writers has a thoughtful rumination on the constant tussle between beauty and truth in science.

May 21, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

Genes and Race: The Distant Footfalls of Evidence

A review of Nicholas Wade’s book, “A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History“. In this book NYT science writer Nicholas Wade advances two simple premises: firstly, that we should stop looking only toward culture as a determinant of differences between populations and individuals, and secondly, that those who claim that race is only a [...]

May 13, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
The structure of DNA, 61 years later: How they did it.

The structure of DNA, 61 years later: How they did it.

  This month marks the sixty-first anniversary of the publication of the landmark paper on the structure of DNA by Watson and Crick, which appeared in the April 25, 1953 issue of the journal Nature.

April 29, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

Drug costs and prices: Here we go again

Misleading statements and conclusions regarding drug costs and prices are again being thrown around. It started with a post right here on Scientific American Blogs with the title “The Quest: $84,000 Miracle Cure Costs Less Than $150 to Make”.

April 24, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Y Combinator and biotech: The wave of the future?

Y Combinator and biotech: The wave of the future?

Y Combinator is the well-known startup incubator that picks promising computer technology startup ideas from a competition every year and seeds them with a few tens of thousands of dollars and dedicated space in Silicon Valley in return for an equity stake.

April 24, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar

It’s the end of fundamental physics. Again.

Fellow Scientific American blogger John Horgan is at it again. This time he is heralding the end of fundamental physics based on the increasing time lag between Nobel Prizes awarded for fundamental discoveries.

April 16, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Diversifiers of the world – Unite!

Diversifiers of the world – Unite!

On my computer screen right now are two molecules. They are both large rings with about thirty atoms each, a motley mix of carbons, hydrogens, oxygens and nitrogens.

April 15, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar
Physics envy: The last emotion you ever want to feel

Physics envy: The last emotion you ever want to feel

This is a guest post by my friend Pinkesh Patel, a data scientist at Facebook. Pinkesh has a PhD in physics from Caltech during which he worked on LIGO, the gravitational wave detector.

April 3, 2014 — Ashutosh Jogalekar