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Stories by Bryan Bumgardner

“Eco-Goats” to Storm D.C. Cemetery

From Aug. 7 to 12, The Historic Congressional Cemetery in Washington D.C. is embracing a new type of green technology, one that will clear unwanted plant species while producing fresh fertilizer: “eco goats.” A herd of more than 100 goats will be temporarily grazing along the edges of the cemetery, clearing a 1.6-acre area of [...]

August 2, 2013 — Bryan Bumgardner

Is Bradley Manning Guilty or Innocent?

Bradley Manning, the U.S. soldier responsible for the public release of more than 700,000 classified documents, was acquitted July 30 of the controversial “aiding the enemy charge” by a military judge, further inflaming public discussion about Manning’s role: was he a heroic whistleblower or a treasonous leaker of government data?

July 30, 2013 — Bryan Bumgardner

Zombie Tits, Ungifted and Animal Wise Authors Win Scientific American s Summer Reading Poll

Join our G+ Hangout On Air at noon today (Friday, July 26) with the three winning authors, here:G+ Hangout on Air with Virginia Morell, Rebecca Crew and Scott Barry Kaufman, hosted by SA blogger Joanne Manaster The votes are in for Scientific American’s poll in which we asked readers to choose their favorite authors from our list of the best summer science books of 2013.We are excited to announce our three winners! Becky Crew, author of Zombie Tits, Astronaut Fish and other Weird Creatures Scott Barry Kaufman, author of Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined Virginia Morell, author of Animal Wise: The Thoughts and Emotions of our Fellow Creatures All three authors are set to join us live for a Google Plus Hangout on Air at noon Eastern on Friday, July 26.

July 22, 2013 — Bryan Bumgardner

Bizarre New Texas Longhorn Dinosaur Bolsters Controversial Theory of Dino Diversity

Reconstruction by Rob Gaston A newly unearthed dinosaur has been called the "Texas longhorn" of its family tree, and it's not hard to see why: Nasutoceratops titusi , a relative of the famous Triceratops, sported 3.5-foot-long horns, measured 15 feet long from nose to tail, and weighed 2.5 tons.

July 17, 2013 — Bryan Bumgardner

Vote for the Best Summer Books on Science

Earlier this month, Scientific American editors and contributors published a list of this summer's best science books, collecting titles from the "Recommended" page in our magazine and the "Books" section of our website.Now we want to bring you closer to the authors of these books.

July 2, 2013 — Bryan Bumgardner

Is It Possible to Keep Electronic Secrets?

Unless you live under a rock, you've heard of PRISM, a vast digital surveillance program run by the National Security Agency that was recently revealed by a whistleblower.

June 10, 2013 — Bryan Bumgardner