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Stories by Michael S. Gazzaniga

Neuroscience in the Courtroom

Brain scans and other types of neurological evidence are rarely a factor in trials today. Someday, however, they could transform judicial views of personal credibility and responsibility

April 1, 2011 — Michael S. Gazzaniga

Spheres of Influence

Split-brain patients—whose two hemispheres are separated surgically—provide fascinating clues to how a unitary sense of consciousness emerges from the furious activity of billions of brain cells

June 1, 2008 — Michael S. Gazzaniga

Brain Scans Go Legal

Courts are beginning to allow brain images as evidence, but current technology is nowhere near trustworthy enough to determine or absolve guilt

December 1, 2006 — Scott T. Grafton, Walter P. Sinnott-Armstrong, Suzanne I. Gazzaniga and Michael S. Gazzaniga, Walter P. Sinnott-Armstrong, Suzanne I. Gazzaniga and Michael S. Gazzaniga

Smarter on Drugs

We recoil at the idea of people taking drugs to enhance their intelligence. But why?

October 1, 2005 — Michael S. Gazzaniga

The Split Brain Revisited

Groundbreaking work over four decades has led to ongoing insights about brain organization and consciousness

April 1, 2002 — Michael S. Gazzaniga

The Split Brain Revisited

Groundbreaking work that began more than a quarter of a century ago has led to ongoing insights about brain organization and consciousness

July 1, 1998 — Michael S. Gazzaniga

The Split Brain in Man

The human brain is actually two brains each capable of advanced mental functions. When the cerebrum is divided surgically, it is as if the cranium contained two separate spheres of consciousness

August 1, 1967 — Michael S. Gazzaniga