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Stories by Torrence V. Johnson

    TORRENCE V. JOHNSON has an asteroid named after him: 2614 Torrence, a body about one kilometer in diameter. Working at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., he has been the project scientist for Galileo since 1977--some three quarters of his career as a planetary scientist. He was a member of the imaging team for Voyager and is now on the imaging team for the Cassini mission to Saturn.
  • New Light on the Solar System | Space The Galileo Mission to Jupiter and its Moons

    The Galileo Mission to Jupiter and its Moons

    GALILEO SPACECRAFT, beset by technical troubles, still conducted a comprehensive study of the JOVIAN SYSTEM. Few predicted that the innards of these worlds would prove so varied

    September 1, 2003 |

  • February 2000 | Space The Galileo Mission to Jupiter and Its Moons

    The Galileo Mission to Jupiter and Its Moons

    Few scientists thought that the Galileo spacecraft, beset by technical troubles, could conduct such a comprehensive study of the Jovian system. And few predicted that the innards of these worlds would prove so varied

    February 1, 2000 |

  • December 1995 | Space The Galileo Mission

    The Galileo Mission

    From orbit around Jupiter, the Galileo spacecraft will take the closest look ever at the planet and its natural satellites

    December 1, 1995 |

  • Scientific American Volume 256, Issue 4 | Space The Moons of Uranus

    The Moons of Uranus

    Voyager 2 photographed the five major moons at close range. All have icy surfaces, but they are darker and rockier than Saturn's moons. Early in their history three were geologically vigorous

    April 1, 1987 |

  • Scientific American Volume 249, Issue 6 | Space Io

    Io

    The solar system's most active volcanic world is a moon of Jupiter whose geyser like eruptions and massive lava flows yield evidence of exotic volcanic fluids. Their source of energy is gravitational

    December 1, 1983 |

  • Scientific American Volume 246, Issue 1 | Space The Moons of Saturn

    The Moons of Saturn

    The 17 icy bodies that orbit the planet display a surprising range of geological evolution. Many of them show craters more than four billion years old, but one of them has terrain so new that no craters are seen

    January 1, 1982 |

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