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Kinsey Reporter

Kinsey Reporter

Indiana University’s Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research, CNetS, in collaboration with The Kinsey Institute, has released Kinsey Reporter, a global mobile survey platform for collecting and sharing anonymous data about sexual and other intimate behaviors. The pilot project allows citizen observers around the world to use free applications now available for Apple and Android mobile platforms to not only report on sexual behavior and experiences, but also to share, explore and visualize the accumulated data.

Using Kinsey Reporter, participants can submit an anonymous report of sexual or intimate activity within 24 hours of an event. The report can be about the user or someone else they’ve observed. The resulting surveys—or reports of information shared by many individuals—cover sexual behaviors and events, sexual health issues, violence reports, public displays of affection and other experiences. Users can submit reports on different events as often as they’d like but they can only select among the provided tags when answering a question. To protect anonymity, the reports only use approximate locations selected by survey participants.

Project Details

  • PRINCIPAL SCIENTIST: N/A
  • SCIENTIST AFFILIATION: The Kinsey Institute, CNetS, Indiana University
  • DATES: Ongoing
  • PROJECT TYPE: Questionnaire
  • COST: Free
  • GRADE LEVEL: 18+ years old
  • TIME COMMITMENT: Variable
  • HOW TO JOIN:

    Visit the Kinsey Reporter Web site and download one of the apps.

See more projects in FreeQuestionnaire18+ years old.

What Is Citizen Science?

Research often involves teams of scientists collaborating across continents. Now, using the power of the Internet, non-specialists are participating, too. Citizen Science falls into many categories. A pioneering project was SETI@Home, which has harnessed the idle computing time of millions of participants in the search for extraterrestrial life. Citizen scientists also act as volunteer classifiers of heavenly objects, such as in Galaxy Zoo. They make observations of the natural world, as in The Great Sunflower Project. And they even solve puzzles to design proteins, such as FoldIt. We'll add projects regularly—and please tell us about others you like as well.

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