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National Moth Week 2014

National Moth Week 2014

From Maine to Florida, California to Pennsylvania and in more than 25 countries around the world, citizen scientists will mark the third annual National Moth Week, July 19-27, with moth-watching events and educational programs focused on these amazing creatures so vital to the Earth’s environment and ecosystems.
 
National Moth Week’s main goal is to promote moths, and more generally, biodiversity, by encouraging interested parties to organize events at their local park, environmental education center, university, or homes. The events encourage citizen scientists to contribute photos and data to online databases. In 2013 alone, participants submitted thousands of photos and pieces of data.
 
Organizers have designated 2014 as “the year of the silk moth,” to encourage moth-ers to look for and learn about these fascinating moths in the Saturniidae family. National Moth Week’s symbol, the Automeris io, is a colorful silk moth found in the U.S. and Canada.
 
Here is a map of National Moth Week events throughout the U.S.

Project Details

  • PRINCIPAL SCIENTIST: David Moskowitz and Liti Haramaty
  • SCIENTIST AFFILIATION: Friends of the East Brunswick (N.J.) Environmental Commission
  • DATES: Saturday, July 19, 2014 - Sunday, July 27, 2014
  • PROJECT TYPE: Fieldwork
  • COST: Free
  • GRADE LEVEL: All Ages
  • TIME COMMITMENT: Variable
  • HOW TO JOIN:

    Register an event or join a public event.  Mothing can be done anywhere- at parks, nature centers, backyards and even in towns and cities. Learn more at the Finding Moths page.

See more projects in FreeFieldworkAll Ages.

What Is Citizen Science?

Research often involves teams of scientists collaborating across continents. Now, using the power of the Internet, non-specialists are participating, too. Citizen Science falls into many categories. A pioneering project was SETI@Home, which has harnessed the idle computing time of millions of participants in the search for extraterrestrial life. Citizen scientists also act as volunteer classifiers of heavenly objects, such as in Galaxy Zoo. They make observations of the natural world, as in The Great Sunflower Project. And they even solve puzzles to design proteins, such as FoldIt. We'll add projects regularly—and please tell us about others you like as well.

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