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Play with Your Dog

Play with Your Dog

UPDATE: Please send your video submissions to the researchers by March 31, 2013.

The Horowitz Dog Cognition Lab in NYC is investigating the different ways people and dogs play together, and we need your help (well, you and your dog’s help). We are cataloguing all the ways people play with their dogs and asking dog owners to submit short videos of their own dog-human play.

Project: Play with Your Dog is open to anyone, in any country. If you live with a dog, we want to see you play.

To participate, find or make a 30-60 second video of you and your dog playing in whatever way you like to play together, and then upload the video to our website and complete a short survey. You are also invited to add a picture of you and your dog to our Wall of Contributors.

By participating in Project: Play with Your Dog, citizen scientists are providing valuable information into the nuances and intricacies of our relationships with dogs.

Project Details

  • PRINCIPAL SCIENTIST: Alexandra Horowitz and Julie Hecht
  • SCIENTIST AFFILIATION: Horowitz Dog Cognition Lab, Barnard College
  • DATES: Ongoing
  • PROJECT TYPE: Fieldwork
  • COST: Free
  • GRADE LEVEL: All Ages
  • TIME COMMITMENT: Variable
  • HOW TO JOIN:

    Visit DogHumanPlay.com and follow the instructions:
    Complete a short survey
    Upload a video of you and your dog playing (in whatever way you like to play together)
    Share a picture of you and your dog on our Wall of Contributors (optional)

See more projects in FreeFieldworkAll Ages.

What Is Citizen Science?

Research often involves teams of scientists collaborating across continents. Now, using the power of the Internet, non-specialists are participating, too. Citizen Science falls into many categories. A pioneering project was SETI@Home, which has harnessed the idle computing time of millions of participants in the search for extraterrestrial life. Citizen scientists also act as volunteer classifiers of heavenly objects, such as in Galaxy Zoo. They make observations of the natural world, as in The Great Sunflower Project. And they even solve puzzles to design proteins, such as FoldIt. We'll add projects regularly—and please tell us about others you like as well.

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