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Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey

Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey

The ruffed grouse is a forest species widely distributed across New York State. While some grouse are found in more mature forests, the greatest population densities are in younger-aged forests. These species prefer habitats in an early stage of succession such as young forests, shrublands, and old orchards and fields. As New York's forests grow older, these preferred habitats are declining, resulting in a decline in grouse and woodcock numbers since the 1960s. Turkey hunters in pursuit of that wary gobbler this spring are ideally suited for monitoring ruffed grouse during the breeding season.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) currently monitors grouse populations in the fall through the Cooperator Ruffed Grouse Hunting Log where hunters record the number of birds flushed per hour of hunting effort. The Ruffed Grouse Drumming Survey provides a harvest-independent index of grouse distribution and abundance during the critical breeding season in the spring. Grouse and woodcock share many of the same habitats, so the information you provide will help monitor populations of both of these great game birds as habitats change both locally and on a landscape scale.

Project Details

  • PRINCIPAL SCIENTIST: Joe Martens, Commissioner
  • SCIENTIST AFFILIATION: N.Y. State Department of Environmental Conservation
  • DATES: Ongoing
  • LOCATION: New York -
  • PROJECT TYPE: Observation
  • COST: Free
  • GRADE LEVEL: 18+ years old
  • TIME COMMITMENT: Variable
  • HOW TO JOIN:

    Visit the N.Y. State DEC Web site.

See more projects in New YorkFreeObservation18+ years old.

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