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Treezilla

Treezilla

Citizen scientists can use Treezilla to record the trees near them and to find out how they benefit the local environment. Upload photos of the tree when you enter the tree details on Treezilla. Include a general shot to show the whole tree, the trunk to show bark detail, close-up of the buds on a twig, then depending on time of year also give a picture of leaf, fruit and flowers. The community of users on Treezilla should then help out with the identification.

As a citizen science platform, Treezilla can be used to serve a wide variety scientific objectives. For example, studies of the epidemiology of new and emerging tree diseases, evaluation of ecosystem services provided by trees, effects of climate change on tree growth and condition and macroecology.

There are a number of Web sites that give help on tree identification. A sister project to Treezilla, iSpot.org, has a set of keys to variety of wildlife including trees. Treezilla’s site includes an FAQ with additional information about the project.

Treezilla is sponsored by The Open University, The OpenScience Laboratory, Treeconomics, iSpot, Forest Research and OpenTreeMap.

Project Details

  • PRINCIPAL SCIENTIST: N/A
  • SCIENTIST AFFILIATION: N/A
  • DATES: Ongoing
  • LOCATION: -
  • PROJECT TYPE: Fieldwork
  • COST: Free
  • GRADE LEVEL: All Ages
  • TIME COMMITMENT: Variable
  • HOW TO JOIN:

    Sign up or log in at the Treezilla Web site.

See more projects in FreeFieldworkAll Ages.

What Is Citizen Science?

Research often involves teams of scientists collaborating across continents. Now, using the power of the Internet, non-specialists are participating, too. Citizen Science falls into many categories. A pioneering project was SETI@Home, which has harnessed the idle computing time of millions of participants in the search for extraterrestrial life. Citizen scientists also act as volunteer classifiers of heavenly objects, such as in Galaxy Zoo. They make observations of the natural world, as in The Great Sunflower Project. And they even solve puzzles to design proteins, such as FoldIt. We'll add projects regularly—and please tell us about others you like as well.

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