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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Citizen Science Grants (NYC)

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Citizen Science Grants (NYC)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is encouraging individuals and community groups in New York City to apply for grants that will allow citizen scientists to collect information on air and water pollution in their communities and seek solutions to environmental and public health problems. The EPA will award a total of $125,000 for five to 10 New York City projects related to air or water pollution.

Projects receiving funding through the citizen science grants will be expected to promote a comprehensive understanding of local pollution problems as well as identify and support activities that address them at the local level. Proposed projects must also consider environmental justice and should engage, educate and empower communities.

All applications are due no later than April 20, 2012, at 5:00 P.M. EST.

Project Details

  • PRINCIPAL SCIENTIST: Paula Zevin, volunteer coordinator
  • SCIENTIST AFFILIATION: EPA Division of Environmental Science and Assessment
  • DATES: Ongoing
  • LOCATION: New York - New York City
  • PROJECT TYPE: Observation
  • COST: Free
  • GRADE LEVEL: All Ages
  • TIME COMMITMENT: Variable
  • HOW TO JOIN:

    Click here for additional information about the grants and how to apply for them.

See more projects in New YorkFreeObservationAll Ages.

What Is Citizen Science?

Research often involves teams of scientists collaborating across continents. Now, using the power of the Internet, non-specialists are participating, too. Citizen Science falls into many categories. A pioneering project was SETI@Home, which has harnessed the idle computing time of millions of participants in the search for extraterrestrial life. Citizen scientists also act as volunteer classifiers of heavenly objects, such as in Galaxy Zoo. They make observations of the natural world, as in The Great Sunflower Project. And they even solve puzzles to design proteins, such as FoldIt. We'll add projects regularly—and please tell us about others you like as well.

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