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Zooniverse: Project Star Date M83

Zooniverse: Project Star Date M83
Study Hubble telescope images to help identify the ages of the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy’s (M83) many star clusters.

Galaxies are made of stars — but where do these stars come from? Most stars form in star clusters rather than in isolation. Many star clusters then fall apart over time, their stars spreading out to form the galaxy as a whole.
 
This is the central theme of the Star Date: M83 citizen science project: to better understand the life cycle of star clusters, from infancy to old age and from formation to destruction. To do this we need to estimate the ages of star clusters and then study how many clusters there are at each age. Along the way we will also learn more about the host galaxy itself, particularly how star clusters form along its spiral arms.
 
In Project Star Date M83, citizen scientists will pair their discerning eye with the Hubble telescope’s detailed images to identify the ages of the Southern Pinwheel Galaxy’s (M83) many star clusters. This info helps researchers learn how star clusters are born, evolve and eventually fall apart in spiral galaxies.
 

Project Details

  • PRINCIPAL SCIENTIST: Various
  • SCIENTIST AFFILIATION: Various
  • DATES: Ongoing
  • PROJECT TYPE: Data Processing
  • COST: Free
  • GRADE LEVEL: All Ages
  • TIME COMMITMENT: Variable
  • HOW TO JOIN:

    Visit the Star Date: M83 project Web site to sign up.

See more projects in FreeData ProcessingAll Ages.

What Is Citizen Science?

Research often involves teams of scientists collaborating across continents. Now, using the power of the Internet, non-specialists are participating, too. Citizen Science falls into many categories. A pioneering project was SETI@Home, which has harnessed the idle computing time of millions of participants in the search for extraterrestrial life. Citizen scientists also act as volunteer classifiers of heavenly objects, such as in Galaxy Zoo. They make observations of the natural world, as in The Great Sunflower Project. And they even solve puzzles to design proteins, such as FoldIt. We'll add projects regularly—and please tell us about others you like as well.

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