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  • How to Plan for Your Future Self

    How to Plan for Your Future Self

    Getting to know yourself—and your future self—can put you on a path toward contentment

    March 1, 2014

  • Can an Atheist Be in Awe of the Universe?

    Can an Atheist Be in Awe of the Universe?

    What does the magnificence of the universe have to do with God?

    March 1, 2014

  • Prions Are Key to Preserving Long-Term Memories

    Prions Are Key to Preserving Long-Term Memories

    The famed protein chain reaction that made mad cow disease a terror may be involved in helping to ensure that our recollections don't fade

    February 18, 2014

  • New Drugs May Transform Down Syndrome

    New Drugs May Transform Down Syndrome

    Recent breakthroughs may lead to pharmacological treatments for the chromosomal disorder

    March 1, 2014

  • Pupils Dilate or Expand in Response to Mere Thoughts of Light or Dark

    Pupils Dilate or Expand in Response to Mere Thoughts of Light or Dark

    Imagination triggers some of the same physical mechanisms involved in actual sight

    March 1, 2014

  • Honesty’s Daily Decline

    Honesty’s Daily Decline

    Are you more likely to lie in the afternoon than in the morning?

    February 25, 2014

  • A Happy Life May Not Be a Meaningful Life

    A Happy Life May Not Be a Meaningful Life

    Tasks that seem mundane, or even difficult, can bring a sense of meaning over time

    February 18, 2014

  • Start Playing Cupid – It’ll Make You Happier

    Start Playing Cupid – It’ll Make You Happier

    A Valentine’s message: playing the matchmaker brings psychological benefits

    February 11, 2014

  • The Mind of the Prodigy

    The Mind of the Prodigy

    Prodigies dazzle us with their virtuoso violin concertos, seemingly prescient chess moves, and vivid paintings. While their work would be enough to impress us if they were 40, prodigies typically reach adult levels of performance in non-verbal, rule-based domains such as chess, art, and music before the age of 10.

    February 10, 2014

  • Postmortem of Famous Patient's Brain Explains Why "H. M." Couldn't Learn

    Postmortem of Famous Patient's Brain Explains Why "H. M." Couldn't Learn

    H.M. (Henry Gustav Molaison) was missing part of the hippocampus, which is involved in creating memories

    January 30, 2014

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