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Tiny Martian moon

Enlarge Image credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona MORE IMAGES

Deimos is the smaller of Mars's two tiny, asymmetrical moons at less than 10 miles across, and it orbits farther from the Red Planet (14,500 miles) than its larger counterpart Phobos does. Both moons appear to have a similar composition to a typical class of asteroid, pointing to their likely origin as captured objects from the asteroid belt. This detailed image from February comes from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) camera, which has already provided stunning 3-D views of the Red Planet and recent photographic evidence of water flows on the Martian surface in the not-too-distant past.

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