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Where Was the Birthplace of Mankind?

Flints Called Eoliths, 1,000,000 Years Old and Flaked so Crudely that Only the Expert Can Tell Whether Man or Nature Made Them, Have Been Discovered in Europe. What Do They Signify?

By J. Reid Moir

The Carbonization of Coal at Low Temperatures

Coal Smoke Is Not a Necessary Evil; It Represents Wasted Fuel. New Processes Which Will Turn This Waste Into Valuable By-products Are Being Developed. What Is Their Real Significance?

By H. W. Brooks

Radio's Silver Screen

Cluster of Seven Lights Carries Inventor Toward the Goal of Wireless Vision

By Orrin E. Dunlap Jr.

Japan's New Cruisers

Latest Addition to the Growing Fleet of Cruisers Consists of Four Ships Showing Remarkable Novelty of Design

By Oscar Parkes

In the World of Chemistry

A Department Devoted to the Advancements Made in Industrial and Experimental Chemistry

By D. H. Killeffer

Buried Secrets of the Holy Land

All Over the Bible Lands, from Dan to Beersheba, the Archeologist Is Busy Turning Over Ancient Mounds and Revealing City Sites

By Harold J. Shepstone

Building Blocks of the Universe

The Romantic Search for New Chemical Elements Is Not a Blind Hunt But Is Guided By Remarkably Beautiful Scientific Principles of Prediction. How the New Element "Illinium" Was Found. Other Elements Are Now Being Sought

By B. S. Hopkins

Applied Science for the Amateur, February 1927

A department devoted to the presentation of useful ideas wherein will department devoted to the presentation of useful ideas wherein will be found material of practical value for those who are mechanically inclined

By A. P. Peck

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