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The Parasitic Wasp's Secret Weapon

Parasitic wasps must develop inside living caterpillars. They survive this hostile environment by smuggling in a virus that suppresses their host's immune system

By Nancy E. Beckage

Taking Nuclear Weapons off Hair-Trigger Alert

It is time to end the practice of keeping nuclear missiles constantly ready to fire. This change would greatly reduce the possibility of a mistaken launch

By Bruce G. Blair, Harold A. Feiveson and Frank N. von Hippel

Mercury: The Forgotten Planet

Although one of Earth's nearest neighbors, this strange world remains, for the most part, unknown

By Robert M. Nelson

Making Rice Disease-Resistant

For the first time, scientists have used genetic engineering to protect this essential crop from disease

By Pamela C. Ronald

Great Zimbabwe

For centuries, this ancient Shona city stood at the hub of a vast trade network. The site has also been at the center of a bitter debate about African history and heritage

By Webber Ndoro

Fighting Computer Viruses

Biological metaphors offer insight into many aspects of computer viruses and can inspire defenses against them

By Jeffrey O. Kephart, Gregory B. Sorkin, David M. Chess and Steve R. White

Fermat's Last Stand

His most notorious theorem baffled the greatest minds for more than three centuries But after 10 years of work, one mathematician cracked it

By Simon Singh and Kenneth A. Ribet

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