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The Quest for a Smart Pill

New drugs to improve memory and cognitive performance in impaired individuals are under intensive study. Their possible use in healthy people already triggers debate

By Stephen S. Hall

The Mutable Brain

Score one for believers in the adage "Use it or lose it." Targeted mental and physical exercises seem to improve the brain in unexpected ways

By Marguerite Holloway

Stimulating the Brain

Activating the brain's circuitry with pulsed magnetic fields may help ease depression, enhance cognition, even fight fatigue

By Mark S. George

Mind Readers

Brain-scanning machines may soon be capable of discerning rudimentary thoughts and separating fact from fiction

By Philip Ross

Is Better Best?

A noted ethicist argues in favor of brain enhancement

By Arthur L. Caplan

Diagnosing Disorders

Psychiatric illnesses are often hard to recognize, but genetic testing and neuroimaging could someday be used to improve detection

By Steven E. Hyman

Brain, Repair Yourself

How do you fix a broken brain? The answers may literally lie within our heads. The same approaches might also boost the power of an already healthy brain

By Fred H. Gage

Taming Stress

An emerging understanding of the brain's stress pathways points toward treatments for anxiety and depression beyond Valium and Prozac

By Robert Sapolsky


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