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Climate Change: A Controlled Experiment

Scientists have carefully manipulated grasslands and forests to see how precipitation, carbon dioxide and temperature changes affect the biosphere, allowing them to forecast the future

By Stan D. Wullschleger and Maya Strahl

Worm Charmers

As Charles Darwin had suspected, earthworms that flee from ground vibrations do so to escape hungry moles—even though sometimes it is humans chasing them

By Kenneth Catania

Toxic Gas, Lifesaver

Hydrogen sulfide, a lethal gas best known for smelling like rotten eggs, turns out to play key roles in the body—a finding that could lead to new treatments for heart attack victims and others

By Rui Wang

Evolution of Minerals

Looking at the mineral kingdom through the lens of deep time leads to a startling conclusion: most mineral species owe their existence to life

By Robert M. Hazen

The Moon That Would Be a Planet

Titan, Saturn's largest natural satellite, scarcely deserves to be a called a mere moon. It has an atmosphere thicker than Earth’s and a surface that is almost as varied

By Ralph Lorenz and Christophe Sotin

The Brain's Dark Energy

Brain regions active when our minds wander may hold a key to understanding neurological disorders and even consciousness itself

By Marcus E. Raichle


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