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Biology8509 articles archived since 1845

Espresso Machines Brew a Microbiome of Their Own

Researchers sampled ten espresso machines and found that most of them harbored coffee residues rich in bacteria—including some potentially pathogenic strains. Christopher Intagliata reports

2 hours ago — Christopher Intagliata

The Woman Who Stared at Wasps

The biologist Joan Strassmann discusses the evolution of cooperation, how amoebas can teach us about competition, and why the definition of “organism” needs an overhaul

2 hours ago — Veronique Greenwood and Quanta Magazine

Mongrel Microbe Tests Story of Complex Life

A newly discovered class of microbe could help to resolve one of the biggest and most controversial mysteries in evolution—how simple microbes transformed into the complex cells that produced animals, plants and fungi

16 hours ago — Emily Singer and Quanta Magazine

People Pick Familiar Foods Over Favorites

A study found that the stronger a subject's memory of a particular food, the more likely they were to choose it again, even over foods they professed to enjoy more  

November 27, 2015 — Erika Beras

Vocal Cords Bioengineered from Starter Cells

Researchers took cells from donated vocal cord tissue and successfully grew them on a three-dimensional scaffold to produce new vocal cords that can produce sound  

November 23, 2015 — Steve Mirsky

Humpback Tails Wanted

Help track the movements of humpback whales between their North Atlantic feeding grounds and their breeding grounds in the Wider Caribbean Region

November 20, 2015 — Larry Greenemeier

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