Back

Professional Learning

Home

Courses

Human Memory: Insights from Neuroscientific Research
Human Memory: Insights from Neuroscientific Research

Dates: June 8 – 19, 2015
Interactive Lectures: Available before start date
Live Q&A Session Dates: June 9, 11, 15, 17, 19
Live Q&A Session Time: 12:00 - 12:30 PM, EST
Registration Closes: Wednesday, June 3, 5:00 PM, EST

 

Human memory is a multifaceted cognitive capacity that is both mysterious and fascinating. Why are we able to remember some things and not others? When is memory failure normal and when does it herald brain disease, such as Alzheimer’s? In this course, Dr. Brian Levine, a board-certified clinical neuropsychologist, will discuss what is currently known about human memory processes, with an emphasis on neuroscientific research. Students will draw upon the latest neuroimaging evidence to learn how the brain processes information for later storage and retrieval. Special focus will be placed on autobiographical memory, or memory for one’s own past, as a naturalistic mnemonic capacity essential for understanding memory mechanisms in the brain. After establishing a foundation for understanding normal human memory function, Dr. Levine will outline how memory fails due to aging, stress, psychiatric conditions and brain diseases, synthesizing information with research from clinical samples, functional brain imaging and cognitive science with videos of cases and participatory demonstrations. Finally, Dr. Levine will review techniques for improving memory function, both those that work and those whose claims are overstated. 

The Neuropsychology of Brain Injury
The Neuropsychology of Brain Injury

Dates: July 20 – 31, 2015
Interactive Lectures: Available before start date
Live Q&A Session Dates & Times: 
Tuesday, July 21, 5:00 - 5:30 PM, EST
Thursday, July 23, 5:00 - 5:30 PM, EST
Monday, July 27, 12:00 - 12:30 PM, EST
Wednesday, July 29, 12:00 - 12:30 PM, EST
Friday, July 31, 12:00 - 12:30 PM, EST
Registration Closes: Wednesday, July 15, 5:00 PM, EST

 

Brain injury is a major public health issue, affecting people of all ages. Dr. Lynn Schaefer, a board certified clinical neuropsychologist and brain injury specialist, will explain the different types of brain injury and the difficulties with thinking, memory, and behavior that may result from damage to the brain. Dr. Schaefer will discuss the neuropathology of brain injury and why certain brain regions are more vulnerable to injury than others. She will also describe both the cognitive and psychiatric symptoms of brain injury as well as the roles of the many rehabilitation specialists that care for people with brain injury. Finally, there will be a discussion about how to help prevent this “silent epidemic” of brain injury.

Applied Cryptography
Applied Cryptography

Dates: Sept. 7 – 18, 2015
Interactive Lectures: Available before start date
Live Q&A Session Dates: Sept 8, 10, 14, 16, 18
Live Q&A Session Time: 9:00 - 9:30 PM, EST
Registration Closes: Wednesday, Sept 2, 5:00 PM, EST

 

The last 30+ years have witnessed a revolution in the area of cryptography, bringing real-life security problems to the attention of a vast research community. This revolution created modern cryptography, where researchers started rigorously treating and solving several problems that only a few years before were unknown or seemed impossible to solve. Today modern cryptography is a well-established mathematical discipline, generating a significant amount of interest among theoreticians (building on its strong connections to older disciplines such as complexity theory, number theory, information theory, combinatorics and coding theory), and practitioners (having found several applications to common, real-life problems). This class offers a summary introduction to modern cryptography, and specifically its main problems, solutions and open questions with a heavy focus on application aspects, including real-life uses of modern cryptography solutions. 

Online Learning: Technology and the Future of Education
Online Learning: Technology and the Future of Education

Dates: Nov. 9 – 20, 2015
Interactive Lectures: Available before start date
Live Q&A Session Dates: Nov. 10, 12, 16, 18, 20
Live Q&A Session Time: 12:00 - 12:30 PM, EST
Registration Closes: Wednesday, Nov. 4, 5:00 PM, EST

 

The Internet has revolutionized established conventions across the board. In education, its role is evolving rapidly, and in this course, NYU’s Director of Online and Virtual Learning, John Vivolo, will discuss the changing nature of learning with technology. He will review its history and current state of online learning worldwide, common models, how technology affects pedagogy, and the benefits and pitfalls of asynchronous versus synchronous learning. Mr. Vivolo will also debunk some of the myths surrounding online learning, analyze some of the reasons behind resistance, and examine the available data analytics, including how these data can be used to understand learning patterns and to improve student engagement.

Full Version