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Behavioral Finance: Using Psychology in the Market
Behavioral Finance: Using Psychology in the Market

Dates: May 4 – 15, 2015
Interactive Lectures: Available before start date
Live Q&A Session Dates & Times: 
Wednesday, May 6, 12:00 - 12:30 PM, EST
Friday, May 8, 11:00 - 11:30 AM, EST
Tuesday, May 12, 12:00 - 12:30 PM, EST
Thursday, May 14, 12:00 - 12:30 PM, EST
Friday, May 15, 11:00 - 11:30 AM, EST
Registration Closes: Wednesday, April 29, 5:00 PM, EST

 

Behavioral finance is the integration of psychology and finance. Using the tenets of psychology – the study of how the mind works – behavioral finance delves into the decision-making process under conditions of uncertainty – in this case, the market. In this course, Philip Maymin, PhD, will introduce the concept of behavioral finance and its history as well as the definition of rationality and what it means to be “rational.” He will focus questions of arbitrage, limits to arbitrage, market over- and under-reaction, common investor biases and the ways in which investors’ decision-making deviates from rational process. Most importantly, Dr. Maymin will frame these discussions around what these concepts mean for the nonprofessional investor when making decisions about finance – or other areas of life – in an uncertain environment. 

Online Learning: Technology and the Future of Education
Online Learning: Technology and the Future of Education

Dates: May 11 – 22, 2015
Interactive Lectures: Available before start date
Live Q&A Session Dates: May 12, 14, 18, 20, 22
Live Q&A Session Time: 12:00 - 12:30 PM, EST
Registration Closes: Wednesday, May 6, 5:00 PM, EST

 

The Internet has revolutionized established conventions across the board. In education, its role is evolving rapidly, and in this course, NYU’s Director of Online and Virtual Learning, John Vivolo, will discuss the changing nature of learning with technology. He will review its history and current state of online learning worldwide, common models, how technology affects pedagogy, and the benefits and pitfalls of asynchronous versus synchronous learning. Mr. Vivolo will also debunk some of the myths surrounding online learning, analyze some of the reasons behind resistance, and examine the available data analytics, including how these data can be used to understand learning patterns and to improve student engagement. 

Wind Engineering: Structural Design for Wind Loads
Wind Engineering: Structural Design for Wind Loads

Dates: May 18 – 29, 2015
Interactive Lectures: Available before start date
Live Q&A Session Dates: May 19, 21, 25, 27, 29
Live Q&A Session Time: 6:00 - 6:30 PM, EST
Registration Closes: Wednesday, May 13, 5:00 PM, EST
 
Engineering standards for designing buildings and structures to safely withstand wind load are highly complex. In this course Dr. Emil Simiu, fellow at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), will provide structural and architectural engineers with the practical knowledge and tools needed for the design of structures for wind loads. Taking an intuitive approach, Dr. Simiu uses real-world examples and studies to demonstrate how to interpret and use the provisions of the ASCE 7-10 – standards developed by the American Society of Civil Engineers to identify minimum design loads. He will also cover issues with aerodynamic testing in wind tunnels and how to interpret those reports as well as the modern capabilities of database-assisted design.

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