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Bioinformatics: How to Analyze the Human Genome

Bioinformatics: How to Analyze the Human Genome

Registration Closed

Registration opens in September for November 3 - 14, 2014 session.

This course provides an introduction to the human genome, including both description of relevant concepts as well as practical experience using Web-based bioinformatics tools to analyze DNA and protein sequences. Attendees will learn the structure and features of the human genome and the main types of variations that occur. They will be introduced to the three main online gateways where they will analyze both a single gene and gene sequences as well as explain how software programs predict the clinical significance of DNA variants.

The human genome project was completed in 2003; and between 2007 and now, tens of thousands of individual human genomes have been sequenced. Bioinformatics entails the use of computer programs and databases to analyze proteins, genes and genomes in order to make sense of the vast amount of DNA sequence that constitutes each genome. The arrival of next-generation sequencing allows us to sequence individual genomes rapidly at a relatively affordable cost, opening up new possibilities to understand basic biology, evolution and disease. This course provides an introduction to the human genome using Web-based tools of bioinformatics. No programming experience is required and there are no prerequisites. The course includes an introductory-level description of relevant concepts as well as practical experience in analyzing DNA (and protein) sequences.


Course Objectives

  • List and describe the basic features of the human genome, including its organization into chromosomes and the nature of coding and noncoding DNA
  • Analyze a single gene of interest at three main bioinformatics gateways (National Center for Biotechnology Information, Ensembl and UCSC Genome Bioinformatics)
  • Describe the main methods of generating DNA sequence data from the human genome with an emphasis on the basic work flow and types of data
  • List, describe and visualize the main kinds of DNA variation in a human genome (e.g., single nucleotide variants, structural variation)
  • Analyze human genome sequences using online tools and explain how software programs predict the clinical significance of DNA variants

Meet the Instructor

Jonathan Pevsner, PhD
Professor
Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Neuroscience
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dates & Times

November 3 - 14, 2014
Interactive Lectures:
Available 24/7
Live Q&A Session Time:
To be announced

Level

Intermediate

Credits

0.5 CEUs from IEEE

Technical Requirements

View technical requirements

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