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Special Report

The Future of the Poles

Both the North and South poles are undergoing unprecedented changes as a result of man-made climate change. What does this mean for the region's wildlife and natural resources as countries make claims for territory?

  • November 10, 2008

SciAm and CNN keep an eye on a Planet in Peril

Here at Scientific American , the fate of Earth is an important part of our coverage, from our new publication, Earth 3.0, to a grand plan for solar energy, to daily reporting on climate change.

December 9, 2008 — Ivan Oransky

Thanksgiving Day (in Antarctica) blizzard

Editor's note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the fifth of her updates on the effort as part of ScientificAmerican.com 's in-depth report on the "Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA -- In the U.S.

December 1, 2008 — Robin Bell

Moving the Chess Pieces

Editor's Note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the fourth of her updates on the effort as part of Scientific American.com 's In-depth Report on "The Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA--Ever since we first conceived of this project, the logistics have been complex.

December 1, 2008 — Robin Bell

A shoveling scientific community

Editor's Note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the third of her updates on the effort as part of Scientific American.com's In-depth Report on "The Future of the Poles." McMURDO STATION, ANTARCTICA--The stereotype of a scientist is a solitary figure in a white lab coat manipulating chemicals alone late in the night.  Supporting this lone crusader for science are legions of others who work to make the laboratory function.

November 24, 2008 — Robin Bell

A flight to a continent dressed in white

Editor's Note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the second of her updates on the effort as part of Scientific American.com 's In-Depth Report on "The Future of the Poles." CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND—The flight from the land of green to the land of white may be within our grasp today.  Everything seems to be working.  The van showed up at the allocated time.  The check in process went quickly.

November 21, 2008 — Robin Bell

Getting to Antarctica--Or not

Editor's Note: Marine geophysicist Robin Bell is leading an expedition to Antarctica to explore a mysterious mountain range beneath the ice sheet. Following is the first of her updates on the effort as part of Scientific American.com 's In-depth Report on "The Future of the Poles." CHRISTCHURCH, NEW ZEALAND (11/16/08)--Things have improved since the days of ship and dog sleds, but it still is not easy to get to the center of Antarctica.

November 18, 2008 — Robin Bell

Kayaking Antarctica with Jon Bowermaster

How a warming climate leads to freezing penguins, with journalist and author Jon Bowermaster, who has kayaked the world's seas, most recently in Antarctica. And Cynthia Graber takes us on a tour with a new M.I.T. underwater autonomous vehicle. Plus, we'll test your knowledge of some recent science in the news. Websites related to this episode include www.jonbowermaster.com

November 12, 2008 — Steve Mirsky
The North Pole Is Melting

The North Pole Is Melting

The permanent Arctic ice cap dwindled to a record low this week, presaging a future of a summertime Northwest Passage and obscuring fog

September 21, 2007 — David Biello
Happy International Polar Year!

Happy International Polar Year!

Scientists from around the globe embark on a two-year effort to explore and boost understanding of Earth's poles

March 1, 2007 — David Biello
Unquiet Ice Speaks Volumes on Global Warming

Unquiet Ice Speaks Volumes on Global Warming

Abundant liquid water newly discovered underneath the world's great ice sheets could intensify the destabilizing effects of global warming on the sheets. Then, even without melting, the sheets may slide into the sea and raise sea level catastrophically

February 1, 2008 — Robin Bell

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