You are currently previewing the NEW Scientific American site. Tell us what you think or view the old site

Skip to main content
Special Report

What's Next for AIDS: New Approaches for Tackling HIV in the Developing World

The surprise success this summer of a clinical trial on an antiretroviral-based vaginal microbicide provides new traction for efforts to combat AIDS in the developing world. Here are some new directions to expect for treatment and prevention of this widespread killer

  • August 25, 2010

DNA Drugs Come of Age

After years of false starts, a new generation of DNA vaccines and medicines for HIV, influenza and other stubborn illnesses is now in clinical trials

July 1, 2010 — Matthew P. Morrow and David B. Weiner

HIV genome structure decoded

It might not be super high-res, but researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have described the first full structure of the HIV-1 genome.

August 5, 2009 — Katherine Harmon

Vaginal gel shows effectiveness in preventing HIV in women

A vaginal microbicide can cut HIV infection rates by 39 percent in women, researchers announced Monday. And female study participants who inserted the gel as directed reduced their chances of contracting HIV by more than half (54 percent).

July 19, 2010 — Katherine Harmon

Did Smallpox Vaccine Limit HIV?

The rise of HIV followed the cessation of widespread smallpox vaccination. A small study hints at a possible connection. Steve Mirsky reports

May 18, 2010

Starting Thanksgiving

Enter code: HOLIDAY 2015
at checkout