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Special Report

Earth Thirst: Solving the Freshwater Crisis

New approaches help keep our water supplies safe, but much remains to be done around the world

  • May 21, 2012

Fracking Could Work If Industry Would Come Clean

VANCOUVER—Resistance to hydraulic fracturing in the U.S. has risen steadily in recent months. Citizens and politicians are worried that fracking deep shales to extract natural gas can contaminate groundwater, trigger earthquakes and release methane, the potent greenhouse gas, into the atmosphere.

February 18, 2012 — Mark Fischetti

Book Review: The Future of Water

The Future of Water: A Startling Look Ahead, by Steve Maxwell, with Scott Yates, Published in 2011 by the American Water Works Association, Denver Colo., ISBN 978-1-58321-809-9 Full disclosure: I answered an open e-mail solicitation for reviewers of this new book and received a review copy for free in exchange for my promise of a published review.

June 21, 2011 — Matthew Garcia

Getting to Know Your Water

That sound you do not hear is a half-million people not sighing in relief as the reservoir that slakes the thirst of the population of Raleigh, NC, and many surrounding smaller towns nears capacity for the first time in nearly a year.

March 22, 2012 — Scott Huler

The Coming Crisis Over Water - Texas Tribune Festival panel

There were a lot of interesting panels and sessions at this weekend's Texas Tribune Festival. A lot of nuggets of information, some good dialogue back and forth about energy and environmental policy in Texas.

September 27, 2011 — David Wogan

Facing the Freshwater Crisis

As demand for freshwater soars, planetary supplies are becoming unpredictable. Existing technologies could avert a global water crisis, but they must be implemented soon

August 1, 2008 — Peter Rogers

Want Clean Water? Turn on the Lights

Companies kill deadly bacteria and strip out heavy metals in water using new technologies that range from ultraviolet (UV) light to microbubbles

January 28, 2009 — Larry Greenemeier

Starting Thanksgiving

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