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Special Report

The 2012 Transit of Venus

Venus will pass in front of the solar disk on Tuesday, June 5. The next transit will not occur again until 2117, so don't miss one of the rarest of sky shows

  • June 3, 2012

The Transit of Venus: Viewing Tips from an Astronomer

My family is gearing up for a big weekend of science in New York City. First, there's the annual World Science Festival, which this year is bringing free activities like bug hunting, weather forecasting and marine ecology research to Brooklyn Bridge Park among many other locations.

June 1, 2012 — Anna Kuchment

Where to Watch the Transit of Venus

The transit of Venus in December 1882 Today offers a final opportunity for 21st century stargazers to observe a transit of Venus. For those of you who forgot to bring your telescope to work today, we've got a guide for viewing the transit both indoors and outside.

June 5, 2012 — Daisy Yuhas

Transit of Venus App Enables Cosmic Calculations

A built-in timer allows users to calculate the length of the planet's shadow on the solar disk to reproduce an experiment done in the 19th century with less precise instruments

June 1, 2012 — Ed Oswald and TechNewsDaily

Venus' Transits Through History

Three views of the 2004 Venus transit. Credit: NASA In a matter of hours, lucky observers with clear skies will be able to watch Venus pass in front of the Sun.

June 5, 2012 — Amy Shira Teitel

Venus was Just the Beginning: The Science of Planetary Transits

Are you sick of reading about the transit of Venus this year? Yes? Me too. But the fact is that when astrophysical objects move between us and something else, like the convenient blaze of a star, there is an extraordinary amount that can be learned.

June 5, 2012 — Caleb A. Scharf

The Transit of Venus

When Venus crosses the face of the sun this June, scientists will celebrate one of the greatest stories in the history of astronomy

May 1, 2004 — Steven J. Dick

Sic Transit Venus

One brisk wintry day in 1639, a young man named Jeremiah Horrocks -- barely 20 -- set up a telescope in his quarters near Preston, England and focused an indirect image of the sun onto a small card.

May 25, 2012 — Jennifer Ouellette

Transit of Venus

The Venus transit offers a chance for modern-day stargazers to repeat the experiments conducted by expeditions around the world in the 18th and 19th centuries--with a modern twist

June 6, 2012 — Bora Zivkovic

Wordless Wednesday: Transit of Venus

I couldn't sit back and NOT see something that only comes through every 105 years. So I got off of my duff, drove down to Oklahoma City to the Oklahoma Science Museum to see the Transit of Venus They passed out these Eclipse Shades.

June 6, 2012 — DNLee

The Transit of Venus, Part 1

With a transit of Venus coming up on June 5th or 6th in different parts of the world, Mark Anderson, author of the book The Day The World Discovered the Sun, talks about the great efforts to track the transits of Venus in the 1760s and the science they would produce

May 30, 2012 — Steve Mirsky

The Transit of Venus, Part 2

Mark Anderson, author of the book The Day The World Discovered the Sun, talks about the transit of Venus coming up on June 5th or 6th in different parts of the world and how it will be of use to astronomers searching for exoplanets

May 31, 2012 — Steve Mirsky

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