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Don't Fence Me In: Researchers Devise Bio-Boundary for African Wild Dogs

Africa's second-most endangered predator breaks out of the reserves created to protect it. Now, biologists are finding that it's own urine can be used to contain it

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SNARED

Five-year-old Savanna was snared on a farm in South Africa in September after crossing the Limpopo River. Remarkably, he was able to break the fence wire and return to Botswana where Jackson found him that morning at the den.....[ More ]

BIO-BOUNDARY

John McNutt of the Botswana Predator Conservation Trust places a scent mark on the ground—one of over 500 that have been put in place as part of a bio-boundary to keep wild dogs on the open reserve.....[ More ]

RADIO TRACKING

Craig Jackson holds up a telemetry antenna looking for a signal from radio collars on the alpha male and female in the pack.....[ More ]

PUPPY POWER

The first two litters were born on Tuli in late June, three months after the pack was moved from a fenced park in South Africa.....[ More ]

THE HUNT

A wild dog chases an impala on the Northern Tuli Game Reserve in Botswana.....[ More ]

A DOG'S LIFE

African wild dogs once roamed throughout sub-Saharan Africa but are now the second-most endangered carnivore on the continent after the Ethiopian wolf.....[ More ]

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