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Devils' Advocates: Catching a Slice of Tasmanian Devil Life [Slide Show]

Take a look at the animals that researchers have sighted or captured while in the field to study a contagious cancer that is destroying Tasmanian devil populations
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FREYCINET PENINSULA

Freycinet Peninsula, where author Menna Jones saw her first sick devil in 2001, might one day be a place of hope. If scientists can identify devils that are resistant to the cancer, introducing them to the Freycinet Peninsula might help to restore the region's decimated ranks.....[ More ]

ANOTHER SET OF BABIES

Two five-month-old babies were photographed on their healthy, three-year-old mother in West Pencil Pine. Whereas mothers care for their young, males deal with the mating season's after effects in their own way.....[ More ]

LITTLE DEVILS

This three-year-old mother and her young were photographed in 2000, before the devil tumor disease reached their territory. Female devils are having babies at younger ages these days—a survival strategy that enables at least some of them to perpetuate the species before catching and succumbing to the cancer.....[ More ]

MALE ABOUT TO GO FREE

A four-year-old male stands defiant after being examined and released by researchers in Narawntapu National Park on the northern coast of Tasmania (about 250 kilometers north of the capital, Hobart).....[ More ]

DEVIL MAY CARE

Hamede releases an old, wild female devil after checking her for cancer and giving her a clean bill of health at the West Pencil Pine study site, near Cradle Mountain–Saint Clare National Park, in northwestern Tasmania.....[ More ]

OPEN WIDE

In northern Tasmania Rodrigo Hamede examines the mouth of a male devil for devil facial tumor disease.....[ More ]

DEVIL FREED FROM A TRAP

A devil checks its surroundings before leaving a trap in West Pencil Pine, a study site near Cradle Mountain–Lake Saint Claire National Park, in northwestern Tasmania. Author Jones says that researchers do not much fear being bitten by captured wild devils.....[ More ]

AUTHOR CARRYING A CAPTURED ANIMAL

Menna Jones holds the largest male devil she every caught: a guy named Bozo, weighing it at 13.5 kilograms and living in Freycinet National Park. Jones says: "I love his personality—'I'm the biggest boss, don't mess with me' is written all over his expression in this photo.....[ More ]

POOR DEVIL

This wild three-year-old was the first victim of devil facial tumor disease seen by author Menna Jones , in Freycinet National Park on the east coast of Tasmania. The year was 2001. Tumor cells break off readily and spread from one animal to another when a devil with a tumor bites a second individual during a fight or sex.....[ More ]

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