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Penetrating Piscine Patterns: X-Rays Reveal What's Beneath Fishes' Scales [Slide Show]

A new exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History reveals the complex structures within fish

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LONG AND SPINY:

This x-ray image of the crisscross prickleback, which was preserved in 1910, shows the prickles on the fish's back in great detail.....[ More ]

READY, SET…:

The wedge-tail triggerfish protects itself with two sharp dorsal spines: a large, thick one and a shorter spine behind it. The second spine serves as a trigger, locking the first one in place.  ....[ More ]

SUCKERS:

The torrent loach uses suction cups to hold its position. This recently discovered species has yet to receive a scientific name.....[ More ]

WHAT'S DOWN THERE?:

This fish is called lookdown because of its sloped head appears to gaze downward. These fish swim in small schools.....[ More ]

TINY HORSE:

The 2.5-centimeter-long body of the Dhiho's sea horse curls its tail to hold onto algae or coral. This species is only found in the waters around Japan.....[ More ]

PRICKLY PUFF:

When the long-spine porcupine fish pumps water into its stomach, it becomes round with bristles to ward off predators.....[ More ]

CURVY PREDATOR:

A viper moray eel has a second set of jaws in its throat, and preys on coral reefs.....[ More ]

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