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Auction Offers the Moon--Or at Least NASA Gear That's Been There [Slide Show]

Stargazers will have the opportunity to get their hands on photos, charts, models and other space race relics from NASA missions thanks to an auction to commemorate the Apollo 11 moon mission

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APOLLO REACTION-CONTROL ROCKET ENGINE

NASA used these Marquardt Corp. rocket engines (weighing 45 kilograms each) for attitude control. There were 16 of these reaction-control engines clustered in groups of four on the Apollo service module as well as 16 on the lunar lander ascent stage in the same cluster configuration.....[ More ]

SATURN 5 MODEL

Made by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., the lead NASA center for the development of the heavy-lift Saturn 5 rocket that propelled humankind to the moon, this model stands 122 centimeters tall.....[ More ]

GEMINI SPACECRAFT ROCKET ENGINES

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne engines provided attitude and maneuvering control for the Gemini spacecraft, including pitch, roll and yaw. A set of eight of these bipropellant engines—they burned liquid hydrogen and oxygen—were located in the equipment section aft of the crew compartment, which was part of the orbit attitude and maneuver system (OAMS) .....[ More ]

GRUMMAN--BOEING SHUTTLE PROTOTYPE

This model of an expendable booster space shuttle, designed by Grumman and Boeing, stands 48.3 centimeters tall. It includes a lower booster stage with seven engine ports at the base and two fin-type stabilizers.....[ More ]

INSCRIBED LUNAR CHART

This chart is autographed by six Apollo astronauts— Buzz Aldrin , Alan Bean , Edgar Mitchell , Dave Scott , Charles Duke and Gene Cernan —who also marked their landing areas on it.

Estimated bidding: $10,000 to $15,000....[ More ]

APOLLO 16 EXTRAVEHICULAR ACTIVITY SPACESUIT CUFF CHECKLIST

Lunar module pilot Charles Duke wore this spiral-bound checklist on the cuff of his spacesuit during the second and third lunar surface explorations of the 1972 Apollo 16 mission. It was exposed directly to the lunar environment for more than 12 hours during those exploration periods.....[ More ]

APOLLO 15 LUNAR MODULE FILM MAGAZINE STOWAGE BAG

This bag stored several 70-millimeter and 16-millimeter film magazines for photography outside the lunar module during surface explorations. (The Apollo 15 mission included three such explorations lasting about seven hours each.)

Estimated bidding: $40,000 to $50,000....[ More ]

ATTITUDE CONTROLLER ASSEMBLY FROM THE APOLLO 15 LUNAR MODULE FALCON

This controller assembly is an actual piece of flight control equipment that assisted the landing of the first extended-duration lunar exploration flight of the Apollo Program. It allowed the astronaut to input pitch, roll and yaw maneuvers by moving the hand grip forward and backward, side to side or with a twisting action.....[ More ]

APOLLO 14 COMMAND MODULE WINDOW

This 38.1-by-40.6-centimeter, 2.5-centimeter-thick silica glass with a red outer seal served as a window on the Apollo 14 command module. It was exposed to the vacuum of space for more than 215 hours during the entire Apollo 14 flight—to and from the moon, in lunar orbit, and through the fiery reentry into Earth's atmosphere—a total distance of more than 804,672 kilometers.....[ More ]

APOLLO 14 DUST BRUSH USED ON THE LUNAR SURFACE

This eight-inch-long camera lens dust brush was used on the lunar surface by the Apollo 14 crew on their two missions outside the lunar module.

Estimated bidding: $125,000 to $175,000....[ More ]

DRINK CARRIED ON APOLLO 13

This packet of dehydrated cocoa drink was carried during the Apollo 13 mission but not consumed. Several food items were never eaten during the flight because of the oxygen tank explosion in the service module, which, among other things, caused an electrical power loss to the command module.....[ More ]

EMBLEM CARRIED ON APOLLO 13

This eight-inch-square emblem accompanied astronauts James Lovell, John Swigert and Fred Haise during their ill-fated mission , which was supposed to take them to a landing it the moon's Fra Mauro formation in April 1970.....[ More ]

APOLLO 12 LM STRAP WITH LUNAR DUST–USED INSIDE INTREPID ON THE MOON

Flown on the Apollo 12 lunar module Intrepid , this 25.4-centimeter-long strap was used to secure lunar exploration equipment. During this mission, commander Charles Conrad and lunar module pilot Alan Bean logged more than 31 hours on the moon's surface during November 19 to 20, 1969.....[ More ]

HOME AGAIN

This eight-by-10, black-and-white photograph captures the Apollo 11 crew in the quarantine facility (actually an Airstream trailer ) on the U.S.S. Hornet talking to President Richard Nixon . Nixon had flown to the central Pacific recovery area to welcome commander Neil Armstrong, command module pilot Michael Collins, and lunar module pilot Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin when they splashed down on July 24, 1969.....[ More ]

LUNAR ROCK BOX COVER

Moon rocks were placed in an aluminum storage box that was vacuum sealed on the lunar surface. The crew then placed the box inside the container covers like this for the journey back to Earth to prevent moon dust from spreading inside the lunar and command modules.....[ More ]

ARMSTRONG'S APOLLO SPACESUIT CONNECTOR COVER

The Apollo astronauts' A7L spacesuits consisted of an inner pressure garment assembly (PGA) pressurized with oxygen for breathing, and an outer integrated thermal micrometeoroid garment (I/TMG) that protected the astronaut from temperature extremes and hypervelocity micrometeoroid punctures while on the lunar surface.....[ More ]

MERCURY LIFE RAFT

Made primarily from the synthetic rubber neoprene and lightweight "ripstop" nylon , this life raft was part of the Mercury survival equipment, designed for use after an aborted launch or emergency landing following a spaceflight.....[ More ]

FISHER "SPACE PEN" CARRIED ON AND USED DURING APOLLO 7

NASA in 1965 spent $4,382.50 to buy 34 mechanical pencils (that's $128.89 per pencil) from Houston's Tycam Engineering Manufacturing, Inc., sparking an outcry when these prices became public . That same year, the Fisher Pen Company offered its AG-7 "Anti-Gravity" Space Pen to NASA.....[ More ]

MERCURY–ATLAS 9 HEAT SHIELD SEGMENT

This 2.5-centimeter cube is a piece of the heat shield from astronaut Gordon Cooper 's Mercury capsule, Faith 7 , flown during his May 1963 mission . Cooper's 22-orbit flight lasted more than 34 hours—the longest, and final, flight of the Mercury Program.....[ More ]

MERCURY CAPSULE MODEL

This steel, fiberglass and plastic model is a miniaturized replica of the Mercury spacecraft, identical to the one NASA first unveiled during the April 9, 1959, press conference held to introduce the original seven Project Mercury astronauts (chosen from a pool of more than 500 candidates).....[ More ]

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