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The Art of Tiny Tech: The 2010 Microscopic Photo Competition Prizewinners

The participants of the 36th annual Nikon microscopic photography competition won prizes for minuscule masterpieces rendering really close close-ups of everything from mosquito hearts and rat retinas to soy sauce and soap film

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20TH PLACE:

John Hart from the University of Colorado at Boulder took this image, which is a crystallized melt of sulfur and acetanilide magnified 10x. Hart used a transmitted-light microscope with crossed polars.....[ More ]

19TH PLACE:

This picture features a Wistar rat retina, outlining the retinal vessel network and associated communication channels, magnified 100x. It is the work of Cameron Johnson of the University of Aukland in New Zealand, who used a confocal microscope.....[ More ]

18TH PLACE:

Gerd Guenther of Düsseldorf, Germany, entered this image of soap film, magnified 150x—the product of incident bright-field microscopy.....[ More ]

17TH PLACE:

Using reflected light–illumination microscopy, Charles Krebs of Issaquah, Wash., snapped this photomicrograph of a ichneumon wasp's compound eye and antenna base, magnified 40x.....[ More ]

16TH PLACE:

This 100x close-up of stigma from a four o'clock flower ( Mirabilis jalapa ) was made possible by epifluoresence microscopy and 3-D reconstruction. Robert Markus at the Biological Research Center of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Szeged took the photo.....[ More ]

15TH PLACE:

Using polarized-light microscopy, Ralf Wagner of Düsseldorf, Germany, captured this visual of divaricatic acid from a lichen ( Evernia divaricata ), magnified 10x.....[ More ]

14TH PLACE

Stephen Lowry at the University of Ulster in Northern Ireland imaged these spiral vessels from a banana plant stem, magnified 32x using polarized-light microscopy.....[ More ]

13TH PLACE:

This live mushroom coral, magnified to 6x, was imaged with a fluorescence microscope. James Nicholson, a volunteer at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Culture and Collaborative Research Facility, snapped the picture.....[ More ]

12TH PLACE:

Gregory Rouse of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, Calif., used dark-field microscopy to snap this 10x photo of a juvenile bivalve mollusk in the genus Lima sp .....[ More ]

11TH PLACE:

The immortal life of these HeLa cells expressing Aurora-EGFP (green) was frozen in time at 100x by Paul D. Andrews of the University of Dundee in Scotland. He used deconvolution microscopy.....[ More ]

10TH PLACE:

Using reflected- and transmitted-light microscopy, Yanping Wang of the Beijing Planetarium took this image. It is crystallized soy sauce, magnified 16x.....[ More ]

NINTH PLACE:

Taken by Duane Harland of AgResearch, Ltd., in New Zealand using a fluorescence microscope, the image of this flea ( Ctenocephalides canis ) is magnified 20x.....[ More ]

EIGHTH PLACE:

Honorio Cocera-La Parra from the University of Valencia in Spain took this photomicrograph of the mineral cacoxenite, magnified 18x by a reflected-light microscope.....[ More ]

SEVENTH PLACE:

A magnification of 2,500x was required for this image of an endothelial cell attached to synthetic microfibers, stained with microtubules, F-actin and nuclei—the work of Yongli Shan of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, who used fluorescence and confocal microscopy.....[ More ]

SIXTH PLACE:

John Huisman of Murdoch University in Perth, Australia, snapped this photo of living red seaweed from the genus Martensia , magnified 40x by a bright-field microscope.....[ More ]

FIFTH PLACE:

Using a dark-field microscope, Viktor Sykora of Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic, snapped this image of a bird of paradise ( Strelitzia reginae ) seed, magnified 10x.....[ More ]

FOURTH PLACE:

This photo of a wasp nest magnified at 10x is the work of Ricardo Taiariol of La Spezia, Italy, who used extended depth-of-field stereomicroscopy.....[ More ]

THIRD PLACE:

Sticking with the zebra fish theme, here's a picture of olfactory bulbs, magnified 250x, taken by Oliver Braubach of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.....[ More ]

SECOND PLACE:

This image of the head of a five-day-old zebra fish at 20x, captured with a confocal microscope, earned Hideo Otsuna of the University of Utah Medical Center second prize.....[ More ]

FIRST PLACE:

Jonas King from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., scored first prize with this shot of a mosquito ( Anopheles gambiae ) heart magnified 100x, taken with a fluorescence microscope.....[ More ]

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