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Shadow Fire: 10 Fantastic Photos of Sunday's Annular Solar Eclipse

Professional astronomers and amateurs tapped their creativity to capture the first annular eclipse visible in the U.S. since 1994

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A DIFFERENT VANTAGE:

The European Space Agency's space weather satellite Proba 2 passed through the moon’s shadow four times as it orbited Earth on May 20. This snapshot from one of those instances shows the moon partially eclipsing the sun from Proba 2's viewpoint.....[ More ]

SKYLIGHT:

Flickr-user Naoki Nakashima shot this striking photo of the eclipse through the cloud cover—and through a gap between buildings.....[ More ]

FIRE AND SMOKE:

The transpacific eclipse crossed Japan, including Tokyo, on the morning of May 21, local time, before it was visible in the U.S. West during the evening of May 20. Flickr-user Keiichi Yasu snapped this photo of a cloud-shrouded sun using a Canon EOS 10D digital camera.....[ More ]

HANDY TRICK:

Dylan McConnell cast a tiny image of the eclipse onto a shingled wall in northern California using his fist as a pinhole filter.....[ More ]

PROJECTION SCREEN:

Samia Naccache and Bob Tartar caught the partial eclipse from North Beach, San Francisco, using a clever homemade setup: a square of cardboard with one lens of a tripod-mounted set of binoculars protruding through.....[ More ]

SUNSPOTS:

In Nevada City, Calif., a screen of foliage cast numerous images of the annular eclipse across the wall of a house.....[ More ]

TREE RINGS:

San Francisco was outside the path of the annular eclipse, but the partial eclipse visible there was still striking. Greg Gomes snapped this photo of solar crescents shining through the gaps in foliage.....[ More ]

LOW-TECH:

In Nevada City, Calif., eclipse-watchers projected an image of the sun onto a screen with binoculars as the eclipse proceeded toward annularity. But an even lower-tech solution—using a colander as an array of pinhole projectors—worked remarkably well.....[ More ]

NICK OF TIME:

Pasachoff and his entourage had a clear view of the start of the eclipse. But as the moon moved into the center of the sun's disk, clouds created striking patterns around the ring of sunlight. "It was completely clear except for about 10 minutes around the [approximately] three minutes of annularity," Pasachoff wrote in an e-mail.....[ More ]

MR. ECLIPSE:

Sunday’s solar eclipse was the 55th seen by Jay Pasachoff. An astronomy professor at Williams College and chair of the International Astronomical Union's Working Group on Eclipses, Pasachoff took a team of observers to New Mexico for this latest show.....[ More ]

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