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The Pleasures of the Ocean: Ships and Boats for Play and Leisure, 1914

Luxury liners and pleasure boats from a century ago in the Scientific American Archives

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THE AMERICA'S CUP:

The international yacht competition for 1914 began in June. The races were postponed after World War I broke out that summer and resumed in in 1920.....[ More ]

SHAMROCK IV:

This sailboat was a challenger in the America’s Cup yacht races. Owned by Sir Thomas Lipton (the tea maker) the boat lost when the 1914 races were concluded in 1920.....[ More ]

RESOLUTE:

The defending champion for the America’s Cup yacht race during her first trial spin. The boat held onto the title when the races postponed in summer 1914 were finished in 1920.....[ More ]

THE BRITANNIC:

The White Star Line’s luxury liner was launched in February 1914 but never carried paying passengers. Converted to a hospital ship after the outbreak of World War I, the vessel was sunk by a mine off the coast of Greece in November 1916.....[ More ]

LUXURIOUS SPEED:

The White Star Line’s Britannic (sister ship of the Titanic) was driven in part by a smooth-running, 18,000-horsepower turbine, shown here. The ship was converted to a hospital ship on the outbreak of World War I and never carried paying passengers.....[ More ]

THE BRITANNIC:

This magnificent liner was launched in February 1914. Here, a 105-ton boiler, one of 29, is installed in hull at the Harland and Wolff shipyards in Belfast, Ireland.....[ More ]

CUNARD LUXURY:

This advertisement for the grand new Cunard liner Aquitania sought to emphasize safety and solidity. (The ad appeared only two years after the Titanic sank.)....[ More ]

THE LUXURIOUS AQUITANIA:

Another fine liner owned by Cunard. The maiden voyage arrived in New York City June 5, 1914, carrying over 3,000 passengers. The 618 first-class passengers had access to such opulent surroundings as this smoking room.....[ More ]

LUXURY FOR ONE (PLUS GUESTS):

D. C. Jackling, the Utah mining magnate, had this 230-foot pleasure yacht built, with 10 bedrooms. She was oil-burning (considered much more modern than coal-powered). The boat was sold in 1917 to the Russian navy.....[ More ]

BERTHS FOR BOATS:

​The huge new luxury ships needed large docks close to paying passengers. New piers were built in the Hudson River, New York City. Here, a temporary dam holds back the river while dirt and rock are dug out by steam shovel.....[ More ]

MOTORBOAT RACES:

​With new powerboat designs for the rich came races. Here, the J’en Veux at high speed in races in the Mediterranean Sea off Monaco. (The boat came in second in the long-distance race.)....[ More ]

TECHNOLOGY FOR FUN:

​Messing about in small boats was popular, as this advertisement from 1914 shows. Ole Evinrude of Milwaukee made it easier when he invented a dependable portable outboard motor in 1909. Evinrude outboard motors are still made in Wisconsin.....[ More ]

BUILD IT YOURSELF:

​A contest near Paris in June 1914 drew thirty homebuilt water-cycle machines and 20,000 spectators.....[ More ]

ADVERTISEMENT FROM 1914:

The "Marconi room" for wireless communications onboard a ship lent a veneer of modernity with a hint of safety. It was a great image for this tobacco brand (now defunct) to be associated with in this advertisement from 1914.....[ More ]

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