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Hoisting One for Wind Power: Climbing Crane Expected to Keep Vestas Turbines Spinning [Slide Show]

A Danish wind-power provider develops its own technology to maintain towering turbines in gusts roaring at up to 15 meters per second

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TAKING IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL

ITI Energy tested Orangutan on a tower built at one-fifth scale (compared with a normal turbine tower) and is now looking for partners to turn the prototype into a climbing machine that can be commercialized.....[ More ]

ORANGUTAN

ITI Energy's "Orangutan" wind turbine access system is made up of two friction clamps, connected by a hydraulic structure that allows caterpillar-like motion up and down the turbine tower.....[ More ]

TOWER OF POWER

The current version of the crane features a single crane arm that can install and remove gearboxes and generators. Future versions are expected to be able to do replacement or repair work to the rotor blades themselves.....[ More ]

ON THE RISE

Vestas is developing its climbing crane (still in prototype) to help avoid maintenance delays caused by a shortage of heavy cranes.....[ More ]

STRONG ARM

After the crane reaches the top of the tower it clamps its four claws around the post like a giant robotic hand to provide stability, allowing the crane to operate 100 or more meters above the ground in winds as strong as 15 meters per second.....[ More ]

A NEW OPTION

The Tower Crane, which measures 10 meters long, 2.9 meters high and 3.3 meters wide, ascends through a multistep process.....[ More ]

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