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Stories by Dan Schlenoff

Lawrence in Arabia: from Archaeologist to Spy, 1914

Lawrence in Arabia: from Archaeologist to Spy, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 12, 1914 Here's a short, cryptic note from our December 12, 1914, issue, about scientific work being carried out in the Middle East: "Survey of Southern Palestine.—A considerable amount of surveying and exploration has recently been done along the southern frontier of Palestine under [...]

December 12, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Battleships and Diplomacy, 1914

Battleships and Diplomacy, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: December 5, 1914 Two ships from the German navy had an outsize part in the history of the First World War: the Goeben and Breslau.

December 5, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Battleship Disaster Coverup, 1914

Battleship Disaster Coverup, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: November 28, 1914 On this date 100 years ago Scientific American reported on the sinking of HMS Audacious, one of the British Royal Navy's most modern "dreadnoughts"—the largest and most powerful battleships in existance in 1914.

November 28, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

Care of the Wounded, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: November 21, 1914 From the Scientific American Supplement issue of November 21, 1914, we note, "The first object of an army in war is to disperse or destroy the enemy, but a correlative duty is the care of its own men when wounded or otherwise [...]

November 21, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

The Ferocity of Artillery, 1914

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: November 14, 1914 The tactical use of artillery had been evolving in the years before the Great War: In South Africa in the Anglo-Boer War of 1899-1902 the British developed the concept of the "creeping barrage," where a curtain of shellfire proceeded just in front [...]

November 14, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
The Surprisingly Lethal Submarine, 1914

The Surprisingly Lethal Submarine, 1914

Reported in Scientific American this week in World War I, November 7, 1914 Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz, the man who built up the Imperial Navy of Germany, had dismissed submarines as a waste of money back in 1901.

November 7, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Military Strategy, 1914: Avoid a Knockout Blow

Military Strategy, 1914: Avoid a Knockout Blow

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: October 31, 1914 The articles by “The Military Correspondent of the Scientific American” were probably written by an American army officer.

October 31, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Censorship and Armored Cars, Circa 1914

Censorship and Armored Cars, Circa 1914

This Week in World War I: October 17, 1914 The cover wrap of the issue has a painting of an armored car, charging into—surely not running away from!—some battle, gun blazing.

October 17, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

Aerial Spy, 100 Years before Drones

Reported in Scientific American This Week in World War I: October 10, 1914 Drones are at the forefront of warfare in the 21st century. These unarmed and unpiloted aircraft, big and small, circle far above the battlefield, collecting images and reporting back to headquarters, electronically.

October 10, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
The Dash of Cavalry in the Great War

The Dash of Cavalry in the Great War

Reported in Scientific American, This Week in World War I: October 3, 1914 The opening weeks of the First World War saw sweeping movements of vast armies.

October 3, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Antwerp, 1914: New Technology, Civilian Targets

Antwerp, 1914: New Technology, Civilian Targets

Reported in Scientific American—This Week in World War I: September 19, 1914 The Belgian field army retreated into the fortified city of Antwerp only 16 days after the Germans had invaded.

September 26, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
Needs of the New War: Fresh Aviators and Novel Tactics

Needs of the New War: Fresh Aviators and Novel Tactics

Reported in Scientific American: This Week in World War I: September 19, 1914 The first few weeks of the Great War in Europe had convincingly shown the value of aircraft for reconnaissance work.

September 19, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
First Sea Battle of World War I

First Sea Battle of World War I

Reported in Scientific American this Week in World War I: September 12, 1914 The Battle of Heligoland Bight took place in the North Sea on August 28, 1914.

September 12, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
This Week in World War I: September 5, 1914

This Week in World War I: September 5, 1914

Censored: How the Army Eats In this issue, a telling line reads: "The censors have not allowed the press of the world to state whether or not explosives were dropped on the fortifications of Liège." This special "War Issue" contained much on military theory, organization and resources, but apart from a scattering of images little [...]

September 5, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
This Week in World War I: August 29, 1914

This Week in World War I: August 29, 1914

A Monstrous Paradox In the late 19th and early 20th century before the Great War broke out, Germany (which had become unified only in 1871) could be held up as a shining example of how science and the arts (philosophy, music, painting) could help a country prosper, grow and become civilized.

August 29, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
This Week in World War I: August 22, 1914

This Week in World War I: August 22, 1914

The Vast Scale of War When the Great War broke out the scale of it was unprecedented. Citizens, soldiers and governments alike tried to grasp the sheer immense numbers of combatants and materièl involved.

August 22, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff
This Week in World War I: August 15, 1914

This Week in World War I: August 15, 1914

Germany’s Opening Gambit The German attack on Belgium and France, starting on August 4, 1914, was designed to deliver a crushing blow to the French armies before the Russians and British could mobilize; after defeating the French, the Germans planned to use their extensive railway system to rush their forces to the eastern front to [...]

August 15, 2014 — Dan Schlenoff

20% off Scientific American Health & Medicine

20% off Scientific American Health & Medicine