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Stories by Glendon Mellow

Tree of Life by Michele Banks

If you follow the #scienceart hashtag on Twitter and G+, you'll know that Michele Banks aka @artologica is one of the most active and vocal artists in this new movement.

October 28, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Science-Art Scumble #26

This Scumble's featured artwork takes on the Kraken controversy, by scientific illustrator Nobu Tamura.As long as I've been aware of Tamura's paleontology illustrations and reconstructions, I've been amazed at his tremendous output...

October 23, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Unchanging Art Supplies

Technology in art supplies moves fast, and there are tons of amazing ways to enable new creative explorations appearing all the time. Wacom Inkling Pen.

October 20, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Scratching into Canine Ancestry: Lori Dunn

Most visual art is some form of additive technique: mark-making with graphite on rough paper, building up clay on an armature, applying colour pigments to a canvas and so on.

October 13, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Parasites and Phenotypes: the art of scientist Tommy Leung

While the discoveries in science and developments in technology continue to inspire artists and illustrators with increasing frequency in our culture, some researchers take the tools of illustrators and use them to freely explore new ideas...

October 11, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Coffee Flavoured Science-Art

Somehow, coffee and science-art go together like caffeine and end-of-term, like peanut butter and chocolate. (Damn, now I want peanut butter and chocolate flavoured coffee...).According to Twitter, (which nevereverEVAR lies unless it's about celebrity death), today is International Coffee Day...

September 29, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Science-Art Scumble #25

Welcome to this week's round-up of science-art links. Let's start off with this week's selected images!This week's image is from artist Kaitlin Beckett, of the blog A Curious Bestiary...

September 25, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Sequencing art: Lynn Fellman's paleogenomic slideshow

Communicating science through art is sometimes still in its nascent stages, I think. While traditional + digital scientific illustration using representational techniques will always be central to reaching out with new research, less traditional aesthetic approaches can be just as illuminating and effective at communicating science...

September 22, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Science-Art Scumble #24

A double dose of science-art imagery in this week's Scumble. Both a little creepy. It feels like fall here in Toronto which puts me in a mind of unusual and macabre imagery: Haven , an acrylic painting by horror and fantasy illustrator Russell Dickerson...

September 18, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Spongelab: gaming the art of science education

"What famous painting does this remind you of?"I was sitting in the offices of Spongelab Interactive about a month ago speaking with Jeremy Friedberg, molecular genetics and biotechnology professor, now science education game-guru, and we were discussing the interactive opening image of History of Biology, an expansive mystery game...

September 12, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

It's time for Illustrators to take back the Net

"If you put an image online, expect it to be stolen.""I got it from Google Images; it's free.""Why do you care if people steal your work? It's free exposure."Illustrators, photographers artists and painters have likely all heard these lines or ones like them before...

September 9, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Science-Art Scumble #23

Welcome to this week's Science-art Scumble!Before this year's headline-making hurricane and earthquake, there have been some of the worst New Mexico wildfires in that state's history.

August 28, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Tagging Science Art

Pssshhh! This blog has been tagged for Cities month on Scientific American.Street science-art. Yeah, the science is often incorrect or out of date. The conceptually popular and wildly incorrect 'Ascent of Man' is popular with street artists...

August 17, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Tools change, view is the same

For most of humanity's span, painting has been dominated by the use of small pigment particles bound in a sticky transparent medium of some kind. In the last century, we've developed new ways of making images...

August 15, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Science-art Scumble #22

Let's jump right into the science-art this week:This week's image: Flame Nebula by Lucy Jain:Lucy Jain can be found at: Lucyjain's Blog Lucyjain's gallery on DeviantArt and she is available for commissioned paintings...

August 14, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Scumble #21 - Paleo Controversy Edition

Scumble: ”A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through.”From The Artist’s Handbook , by Ray Smith.This began as a series of posts on my personal blog, The Flying Trilobite, as a way to brush highlights over the tremendous amount of science-based art that’s out there...

August 7, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

The Chemistry of Oil Painting

What chemical properties give oil paintings their luminous glow and deep darkness?Why do they crack?What kind of oil is used?Is it safe to use the oil painting medium on a fresh dandelion salad?As an oil painter for the past 17 years who used to manage at a fine art supply store and notably not a chemist, I'll do my best to explain...

August 2, 2011 — Glendon Mellow

Science-art Scumble #20

Scumble: ”A painting technique in which semi-opaque or thin opaque colors are loosely brushed over an underpainted area so that patches of the color beneath show through.”From The Artist’s Handbook , by Ray Smith.This began as a series of posts on my personal blog, The Flying Trilobite, as a way to brush highlights over the tremendous amount of science-based art that’s out there...

July 31, 2011 — Glendon Mellow
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