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Biology12521 articles archived since 1845

A few words about geophysics in the North Pond

Editor's Note: University of Southern California geobiologist Katrina Edwards is taking part in a three-week drilling project at the Atlantic's North Pond—a sediment-filled valley on the ocean floor—designed to locate and study what she calls the “intraterrestrials”: the myriad microbial life-forms living inside Earth's crust...

March 8, 2009 — Katrina Edwards

Goodbye, Frank, and back to planning next expedition steps

Editor's Note: University of Southern California geobiologist Katrina Edwards is taking part in a three-week drilling project at the Atlantic's North Pond—a sediment-filled valley on the ocean floor—designed to locate and study what she calls the “intraterrestrials”: the myriad microbial life-forms living inside Earth's crust...

March 8, 2009 — Katrina Edwards

Do optimists live longer?

A perennial grump? Always see the glass as half empty instead of half full? Might want to brighten up a bit – if, that is, you'd like to live longer.

March 6, 2009 — Coco Ballantyne
Waking in the Dark: Daylight Saving Time

Waking in the Dark: Daylight Saving Time

Remember to turn clocks ahead one hour this weekend and, if possible, sleep in until the sun rises. Sleep researchers say waking with light is the best remedy for the winter doldrums. Christie Nicholson reports...

March 6, 2009

First domesticated horses in central Asia more than 5,000 years ago

It's pretty hard to milk a wild mare. So researchers attempting to determine whether ancient Botai in northern Kazakhstan had domesticated horses tested their pottery for evidence that they were as fond as their modern descendants of mare's milk (you can see [ left ] a modern mare being milked by a Kazakh woman)...

March 5, 2009 — David Biello

Are doctors zapping patients with too much radiation?

A new study says that the average American is exposed to six times more radiation from medical tests than in the early 1980s, prompting warnings that physicians may be upping patients' cancer risk by giving them unnecessary exams. 

A study by The National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) shows that the average American's overall radiation exposure jumped from 3.6 millisieverts (mSv) to 6.2 mSv per year -- almost entirely a result of radiation-based medical tests...

March 5, 2009 — Coco Ballantyne

Morally Repugnant

A recent study in the journal Science shows that we display the same facial reaction to moral wrongs as we do to bad tastes or smells. Karen Hopkin reports

March 5, 2009

Good news on coring, not so good news for a member of the crew

Editor's Note: University of Southern California geobiologist Katrina Edwards is taking part in a three-week drilling project at the Atlantic's North Pond—a sediment-filled valley on the ocean floor—designed to locate and study what she calls the “intraterrestrials”: the myriad microbial life-forms living inside Earth's crust...

March 4, 2009 — Katrina Edwards

"Bionic" eye restores vision after three decades of darkness

When vision fails, it's often the result of damage to the eye caused by an injury or degenerative disease. In an attempt to restore such vision loss, researchers for more than a decade have been working to develop an optical prosthetic that can restore sight by delivering images directly to the brain...

March 4, 2009 — Larry Greenemeier

Can Babies Be Made-to-Order?

A fertility clinic says it will give couples the option of fiddling with the blueprints for their broods. But how much flexibility will--or should--they have?

March 4, 2009 — Coco Ballantyne

Drill, baby, drill: Our first core samples

Editor's Note: University of Southern California geobiologist Katrina Edwards is taking part in a three-week drilling project at the Atlantic's North Pond—a sediment-filled valley on the ocean floor—designed to locate and study what she calls the “intraterrestrials”: the myriad microbial life-forms living inside Earth's crust...

March 4, 2009 — Katrina Edwards

What's the best Rx for lower-back pain?

Suffer from inexplicable lower-back pain? Exercise may be the best way to keep it away, according to a new analysis of remedies, including workouts, shoe inserts and support belts. 

"We did an evaluation of high quality studies on the prevention of back problem episodes in adults [and] found that, surprisingly, exercise is the only intervention that works, and other popular interventions don't work," says Stanley Bigos, emeritus professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Washington in Seattle, and lead author of the analysis published recently in The Spine Journal ...

March 3, 2009 — Coco Ballantyne

How do you build an observatory on the ocean floor?

Editor's Note: University of Southern California geobiologist Katrina Edwards is taking part in a three-week drilling project at the Atlantic's North Pond—a sediment-filled valley on the ocean floor—designed to locate and study what she calls the “intraterrestrials”: the myriad microbial life-forms living inside Earth's crust...

March 3, 2009 — Katrina Edwards
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