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Evolution6906 articles archived since 1845

On the Origin of Darwin

On this 210th anniversary of Darwin's birth we hear evolution writer and historian Richard Milner perform a brief monologue as Charles Darwin, and former Scientific American editor in chief John Rennie and Darwin's great-great-grandson Matthew Chapman read excerpts from The Origin of Species ...

February 12, 2019 — Steve Mirsky

Neandertal Spears Were Surprisingly Deadly

Javelin throwers chucking replicas of Neandertal spears were able to hit targets farther away, and with greater force than previously thought to be possible. Christopher Intagliata reports...

January 31, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Intimate Hermit Crab Keeps Shell On

A species of hermit crab appears to have evolved a large penis to enable intercourse without leaving, and thus possibly losing, its adopted shell.

January 25, 2019 — Karen Hopkin

Ants Stick to Cliques to Dodge Disease

Ants infected with fungal pathogens steer clear of other cliques within the colony—avoiding wider infection, and allowing for a sort of immunity. Lucy Huang reports. 

January 16, 2019 — Lucy Huang

Mistimed Migration Means Bird Death Battles

Climate change is shifting population numbers and nest building by resident and migratory birds in Europe—sometimes leading to deadly conflict. Christopher Intagliata reports.

January 13, 2019 — Christopher Intagliata

Monogamy May Be Written in Our Genes

In animal studies, a set of 24 genes involved in neural development, learning and memory, and cognition, seem to be associated with monogamy. Karen Hopkin reports.

January 11, 2019 — Karen Hopkin

Ultima Thule and the Apes of Earth

As the New Horizons mission approached Ultima Thule, Rowan University paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara put our close-up study of the Kuiper Belt object into a deep-time perspective.

January 3, 2019 — Steve Mirsky

Introducing Scientific American Health & Medicine

Introducing Scientific American Health & Medicine