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Features

With the Editors, October 1923

A Sunken Boulevard for Automobiles

Protecting Our Great Banks

Armor of Concrete and Steel that Aims to Foil the Scientific Cracksman

By Edward H. Smith

Some Curious Comestibles

Amazing Articles of Food that May be Unearthed in Odd Corners of American Cities

By L. Lodian

With the Men Who Fly-I

Recent Achievements in Practical Aviation, Such as the Coast-to-Coast Flight, Better Engines and Arrangements for Night Flying

By Alexander Klemin

Our Abrams Investigation--I.

Some Preliminary Impressions Regarding the Electronic Reactions of Abrams

The Six-Meter International Cup Race

Practical Criminology at Work

Some of the Adventures of the Scientific Modern Detective

By Norman G. Meade

Behind the Underwriters' Label

The Gruelling Tests Imposed by the Insurance Man Upon Materials and Appliances

By A. G. Ingalls

Automobile Race Track on Factory Roof, The Acid Test for the Eight-Wheel Truck

Electric Welder Vs. Riveter

The Past Successes and Future Promises of Electric Welding

A Rudder that Turns Itself, Proof of Einstein's Theory from the Atom

By Ernst Foerster

Psychic Adventures on the Continent

Sittings with an Apport Medium in Berlin, and Interviews with Several Notables

By J. Malcolm Bird

A Waterproof Motor for Lifeboats, A Veteran Locomotive

By H. C.

Smashing Dishes to Solve their Secrets

Why Uncle Sam Breaks 6,000 Samples of Plate and Window Glass and More than 2,000 Pieces of China In Novel Tests

By George H. Dacy

Stucco Investigation

A Novel Use for Sugar-Cane Waste, A New Silver Which does not Stain, and more

A Free Balloon Without Top-Valve

Why Armored Suits Fail

Some Facts Worth Knowing Regarding the Perforating Proclivities of Armor-Piercing Bullets

By Edward C Crossman

Sunburned Eyes--A Film-Studio Problem, Long-Distance Concerts in Germany

When Water Power Paves the Streets

How the Town of Lawrenceburg Discovered a "Mint" on the Local Creek

By Littell McClung

House-Moving by Ferry, A Machine for Sowing Seed by Hand and more

Poisonous Plants of the Garden

Danger Which Lurks in the Pretty Flowers and Berries Picked at Random

By E. Bade

Slipping Railroad Coaches to Save Time, Use of Kilocycles in Radio and more

The Wembley Park Stadium

Built in London, the Largest Sports Arena to Date, with a Capacity of 125,200 People

By P. J. Risdon

A Traveling School for Railway Men, Standardization of Wood Screws

New Cadmium-Gallium Lamp

When Wood Shrinks

What the Camera Has to Report Regarding the Changes Taking Place During Seasoning

By B. B. Borchers

Chemistry by Court Order

The Lowest Temperature Yet Reached

The Attack Upon Diabetes

Reaching Upward With Concrete

How the Twelve-Story Limit Set on Concrete Buildings Has Been Discarded by Enterprising Architects

By Norman M. Stineman

The Fact, the Course, and the Causes of Organic Evolution, Germany Builds New Super Radio Station

Waterproofing Cloth by Electrical and Chemical Action, An Air Washer for the Automobile

A New and Novel Use for Aluminum

Make-Believe Lightning

Investigating Lightning Voltages in the Laboratory to Solve Lightning Arrester Problems

By F. W. Peek

Radio Without Interference

Experiments Proving that Radio Messages May be Sent Successfully on Wave Length of Ten Meters

By D. H. George

The Storage of Oil

How 23 Billion Gallons of Crude are Piped, Refined and Distributed to the Consumer

Measuring with Light Waves

How the Various Wave-Lengths are Made to Serve as Scales

By W. F. Meggers

Travel and Exploration Notes, October 1923

Departments

  • Electrical Notes, October 1923

  • Radio Notes, October 1923

  • Departments

    Our Point of View, October 1923

  • Inventions New and Interesting, October 1923

  • The Motor-Driven Commercial Vehicle, October 1923

  • The Heavens in October, 1923

  • Recently Patented Inventions, October 1923

  • The Scientific American Digest

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October 1923

See the World from a Different Perspective

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