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Ancient Mayan Astronomy

When Most of Our Ancestors Were Untutored Barbarians, the Mayan Priest-Astronomers Had Developed Their Science to a Mathematical Precision

By Herbert J. Spinden

Crash!

A Veteran Aviator's Impressions After Cheating Death Several Times in Airplane Accidents

By George O. Noville

How Do the Life Processes Work

By Means of the New Micro-manipulator Scientists are Trying to Pry Into the Secrets of Protoplasm, the Living Substance--An Example of the Inestimable Value of Research

By William Seifriz

From the Scrap-book of Science-

Camera Shots of Scientific Events

Marconi Smiles on America

The Inventor of Wireless Comes Across the Sea to Marvel at Radio and to See His Dreams of 1890 Surpassed

By Orrin E. Dunlap

A Scientific Ghost Laid

Fully Investigated, the Supposed Element Nebulium Turns Out to be Nothing but Common Everyday Air

By Henry Norris Russell

Successful Inventors --XIII

Can It Be Sold That Is the Test, Says an Inventor Who Made His Fortune

By Milton Wright

Cricket Champions of China

Passion of the Chinese for Insect Musicians and Fighters Is Age-old and Unceasing

Underground Canal an Engineering Feat

Sea Trip from Mouth of Rhone to City of Marseilles Eliminated by Canal Tunnel

The Atmosphere

What's In It

By W. J. Humphreys

Plate Glass by the Mile

Future Light

Although the Life and Work of Modern Man is Infinitely Better Lighted than it was in the Days of His Ancestors, We are Only at the Threshold of a Still Greater Expansion in ArtificiaI Illumination

By M. Luckiesh

Will the Steam Automobile Return

Success of Recent Tests Renews Interest in Steam as Motive Power for Automobiles

Tropical Telescope Making

A Professional Astronomer on the Island of Jamaica Takes Up An Amateur Art Fostered by the Scientific American

The Origin of Cork Products

The Red Hill Artifacts

New Archeological Discoveries Made in Texas by a Scientific American Reader Point to the Recently Revived Query: How Ancient Is Man in America

By Cyrus N. Ray

"Mountain Climbing" by Air Cable

A New Enterprise Affords Access to High Regions With None of the Accompanying Hardships of a Treacherous Ascent

"Pay-As-You-Use-It"

Automatic Metering of Telephone Calls Proves Equable Method of Computing Charges

By Charles F. A. Mann

Departments

  • A Simulated "Aura", An Indoor Tractor Model Plane and more

  • Departments

    Our Point of View, January 1928

  • A New Automatic Blood Pressure Instrument, Disease of the Joints and more

  • Typewriter Copy Guide, Bird Bath Lawn Sprinkler and more

  • Washing Bench, Bottle Cork with Spray Nozzile and more

  • Roller Bearings End Jerking to Start Trains, Is the January Thaw a Scientific Fact and more

  • Spring Safety Stick, "Time of Flight" Clock and more

  • High Speed Attained by Marconi Beam, Battery Receivers can be Electrified and more

  • A New Lead Hazard, Wood Pulp Shot from Guns and more

  • The Heavens in January 1928

  • Partners Make Telescope, Speaking of the Weather and more

  • Bringing Inventors and Manufacturers Together, Mere Substitution is not Invention, and more

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January 1928

See the World from a Different Perspective

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